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Breast cancer in relation to the occurrence and time of induced and spontaneous abortion.
Am J Epidemiol 1988; 127(5):981-9AJ

Abstract

The authors evaluated whether an induced or spontaneous abortion during the first six months of gestation, particularly if it occurs before the first term pregnancy, increases the risk of breast cancer. Data from a case-control study of women under 70 years of age were used: 3,200 cases of breast cancer were compared with 4,844 controls with nonmalignant nongynecologic conditions. Among both nulliparous and parous women, the risk of breast cancer was not related to the number of induced or spontaneous abortions. After allowance for all identified potential confounding factors, the estimated relative risk for nulliparous women with an induced abortion relative to those who had never been pregnant was 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-2.2), and for spontaneous abortion, the corresponding estimate was 0.9 (95% CI 0.5-1.5). Among parous women, the estimated relative risks were 1.2 (95% CI 0.9-1.6) for an induced abortion and 0.9 (95% CI 0.8-1.0) for a spontaneous abortion, relative to never having had an abortion of any type. The time of the abortion had little effect: The relative risk estimates were 0.9 (95% CI 0.5-1.4) for induced abortion before the first term birth, 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-1.9) for induced abortion first occurring after the first term birth, 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.2) for spontaneous abortion before the first term birth, and 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.0) for spontaneous abortion first occurring after the first term birth. Similar results were evident for women under age 40, among whom the frequency of induced abortion was relatively high. These data suggest that the risk of breast cancer is not materially affected by abortion, regardless of whether it occurs before or after the first term birth.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Slone Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02146.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2578017

Citation

Rosenberg, L, et al. "Breast Cancer in Relation to the Occurrence and Time of Induced and Spontaneous Abortion." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 127, no. 5, 1988, pp. 981-9.
Rosenberg L, Palmer JR, Kaufman DW, et al. Breast cancer in relation to the occurrence and time of induced and spontaneous abortion. Am J Epidemiol. 1988;127(5):981-9.
Rosenberg, L., Palmer, J. R., Kaufman, D. W., Strom, B. L., Schottenfeld, D., & Shapiro, S. (1988). Breast cancer in relation to the occurrence and time of induced and spontaneous abortion. American Journal of Epidemiology, 127(5), pp. 981-9.
Rosenberg L, et al. Breast Cancer in Relation to the Occurrence and Time of Induced and Spontaneous Abortion. Am J Epidemiol. 1988;127(5):981-9. PubMed PMID: 2578017.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breast cancer in relation to the occurrence and time of induced and spontaneous abortion. AU - Rosenberg,L, AU - Palmer,J R, AU - Kaufman,D W, AU - Strom,B L, AU - Schottenfeld,D, AU - Shapiro,S, PY - 1988/5/1/pubmed PY - 1988/5/1/medline PY - 1988/5/1/entrez KW - Abortion, Induced KW - Abortion, Spontaneous KW - Americas KW - Biology KW - Breast Cancer KW - Cancer KW - Demographic Factors KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Family Planning KW - Fertility KW - Fertility Control, Postconception KW - Fertility Measurements KW - Maryland KW - Massachusetts KW - Multiparity KW - Neoplasms KW - New York KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Nulliparity KW - Parity KW - Pennsylvania KW - Population KW - Population Dynamics KW - Pregnancy KW - Pregnancy Complications KW - Pregnancy, First Trimester KW - Reproduction KW - Risk Factors KW - Statistical Regression KW - Time Factors KW - United States SP - 981 EP - 9 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 127 IS - 5 N2 - The authors evaluated whether an induced or spontaneous abortion during the first six months of gestation, particularly if it occurs before the first term pregnancy, increases the risk of breast cancer. Data from a case-control study of women under 70 years of age were used: 3,200 cases of breast cancer were compared with 4,844 controls with nonmalignant nongynecologic conditions. Among both nulliparous and parous women, the risk of breast cancer was not related to the number of induced or spontaneous abortions. After allowance for all identified potential confounding factors, the estimated relative risk for nulliparous women with an induced abortion relative to those who had never been pregnant was 1.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-2.2), and for spontaneous abortion, the corresponding estimate was 0.9 (95% CI 0.5-1.5). Among parous women, the estimated relative risks were 1.2 (95% CI 0.9-1.6) for an induced abortion and 0.9 (95% CI 0.8-1.0) for a spontaneous abortion, relative to never having had an abortion of any type. The time of the abortion had little effect: The relative risk estimates were 0.9 (95% CI 0.5-1.4) for induced abortion before the first term birth, 1.4 (95% CI 1.0-1.9) for induced abortion first occurring after the first term birth, 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.2) for spontaneous abortion before the first term birth, and 0.9 (95% CI 0.7-1.0) for spontaneous abortion first occurring after the first term birth. Similar results were evident for women under age 40, among whom the frequency of induced abortion was relatively high. These data suggest that the risk of breast cancer is not materially affected by abortion, regardless of whether it occurs before or after the first term birth. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2578017/Breast_cancer_in_relation_to_the_occurrence_and_time_of_induced_and_spontaneous_abortion_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a114901 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -