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Fecal Microbiota in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome Compared with Healthy Controls Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: An Evidence of Dysbiosis.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dysbiosis may play a role in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), hitherto an enigmatic disorder. We evaluated selected fecal microbes in IBS patients and healthy controls (HC).

METHODS

Fecal 16S rRNA copy number of selected bacteria was studied using qPCR in 47 patients with IBS (Rome III) and 30 HC.

RESULTS

Of 47 patients, 20 had constipation (IBS-C), 20 diarrhea (IBS-D), and seven unclassified IBS (IBS-U). Relative difference in 16S rRNA copy number of Bifidobacterium (P = 0.042) was lower, while those of Ruminococcus productus-Clostridium coccoides (P = 0.016), Veillonella (P = 0.008), Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (P < 0.001), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.001), and Gram-negative bacteria (GNB, P = 0.001) were higher among IBS patients than HC. Number of Lactobacillus (P = 0.002) was lower, while that of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (P < 0.001) and segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB, P < 0.001) was higher among IBS-D than IBS-C. Numbers of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (P < 0.001), P. aeruginosa (P < 0.001), and GNB (P < 0.01) were higher among IBS-C and IBS-D than HC. Quantity of SFB was higher among IBS-D (P = 0.011) and lower among IBS-C (P = 0.002) than HC. Number of Veillonella species was higher among IBS-C than HC (P = 0.002). P. aeruginosa was frequently detected among IBS than HC (46/47 [97.9 %] vs. 10/30 [33.3 %], P < 0.001). Abdominal distension (n = 34/47) was associated with higher number of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron, Clostridium coccoides, P. aeruginosa, SFB, and GNB; bloating (n = 22/47) was associated with Clostridium coccoides and GNB. Microbial flora was different among IBS than HC on principal component analysis.

CONCLUSION

Fecal microbiota was different among IBS than HC, and different sub-types were associated with different microbiota. P. aeruginosa was more frequent and higher in number among IBS patients.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Microbiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, 226014, India.

    ,

    Department of Microbiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, 226014, India. ujjalaghoshal@yahoo.co.in.

    ,

    Department of Microbiology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, 226014, India.

    Departments of Gastroenterology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, 226014, India.

    Source

    Digestive diseases and sciences 60:10 2015 Oct pg 2953-62

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Case-Control Studies
    DNA, Bacterial
    Dysbiosis
    Evidence-Based Medicine
    Feces
    Female
    Gram-Negative Bacteria
    Gram-Positive Bacteria
    Humans
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome
    Male
    Microbiota
    Middle Aged
    Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
    Reference Values
    Young Adult

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25784074

    Citation

    Shukla, Ratnakar, et al. "Fecal Microbiota in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome Compared With Healthy Controls Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: an Evidence of Dysbiosis." Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 60, no. 10, 2015, pp. 2953-62.
    Shukla R, Ghoshal U, Dhole TN, et al. Fecal Microbiota in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome Compared with Healthy Controls Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: An Evidence of Dysbiosis. Dig Dis Sci. 2015;60(10):2953-62.
    Shukla, R., Ghoshal, U., Dhole, T. N., & Ghoshal, U. C. (2015). Fecal Microbiota in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome Compared with Healthy Controls Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: An Evidence of Dysbiosis. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 60(10), pp. 2953-62. doi:10.1007/s10620-015-3607-y.
    Shukla R, et al. Fecal Microbiota in Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome Compared With Healthy Controls Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: an Evidence of Dysbiosis. Dig Dis Sci. 2015;60(10):2953-62. PubMed PMID: 25784074.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fecal Microbiota in Patients with Irritable Bowel Syndrome Compared with Healthy Controls Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction: An Evidence of Dysbiosis. AU - Shukla,Ratnakar, AU - Ghoshal,Ujjala, AU - Dhole,Tapan N, AU - Ghoshal,Uday C, Y1 - 2015/03/18/ PY - 2014/11/25/received PY - 2015/02/21/accepted PY - 2015/3/19/entrez PY - 2015/3/19/pubmed PY - 2015/12/17/medline KW - Dysbiosis KW - Functional gastrointestinal disorder KW - Gastrointestinal microbiota KW - Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction SP - 2953 EP - 62 JF - Digestive diseases and sciences JO - Dig. Dis. Sci. VL - 60 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dysbiosis may play a role in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), hitherto an enigmatic disorder. We evaluated selected fecal microbes in IBS patients and healthy controls (HC). METHODS: Fecal 16S rRNA copy number of selected bacteria was studied using qPCR in 47 patients with IBS (Rome III) and 30 HC. RESULTS: Of 47 patients, 20 had constipation (IBS-C), 20 diarrhea (IBS-D), and seven unclassified IBS (IBS-U). Relative difference in 16S rRNA copy number of Bifidobacterium (P = 0.042) was lower, while those of Ruminococcus productus-Clostridium coccoides (P = 0.016), Veillonella (P = 0.008), Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (P < 0.001), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.001), and Gram-negative bacteria (GNB, P = 0.001) were higher among IBS patients than HC. Number of Lactobacillus (P = 0.002) was lower, while that of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (P < 0.001) and segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB, P < 0.001) was higher among IBS-D than IBS-C. Numbers of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron (P < 0.001), P. aeruginosa (P < 0.001), and GNB (P < 0.01) were higher among IBS-C and IBS-D than HC. Quantity of SFB was higher among IBS-D (P = 0.011) and lower among IBS-C (P = 0.002) than HC. Number of Veillonella species was higher among IBS-C than HC (P = 0.002). P. aeruginosa was frequently detected among IBS than HC (46/47 [97.9 %] vs. 10/30 [33.3 %], P < 0.001). Abdominal distension (n = 34/47) was associated with higher number of Bacteroides thetaiotamicron, Clostridium coccoides, P. aeruginosa, SFB, and GNB; bloating (n = 22/47) was associated with Clostridium coccoides and GNB. Microbial flora was different among IBS than HC on principal component analysis. CONCLUSION: Fecal microbiota was different among IBS than HC, and different sub-types were associated with different microbiota. P. aeruginosa was more frequent and higher in number among IBS patients. SN - 1573-2568 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25784074/Fecal_Microbiota_in_Patients_with_Irritable_Bowel_Syndrome_Compared_with_Healthy_Controls_Using_Real_Time_Polymerase_Chain_Reaction:_An_Evidence_of_Dysbiosis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-015-3607-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -