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Short-term weight gain and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor classification among pre- and postmenopausal women.
Breast Cancer Res Treat 2015; 150(3):643-53BC

Abstract

Obesity is well established as a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer incidence and mortality. In contrast, adiposity in early life reduces breast cancer incidence. However, whether short-term weight change influences breast cancer risk is not well known. We followed a cohort of 77,232 women from 1980 to 2006 (1,445,578 person-years), with routinely updated risk factor information, documenting 4196 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. ER and PR status were obtained from pathology reports and medical records yielding a total of 2033 ER+/PR+ tumors, 595 ER-/PR- tumors, 512 ER+/PR- tumors. The log incidence breast cancer model was used to assess the association of short-term weight gain (over past 4 years) while controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. Short-term weight change was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (RR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.09-1.33) for a 4-year weight gain of ≥15 lbs versus no change (≤5 lbs) (P_trend < 0.001). The association was stronger for premenopausal women (RR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.13-1.69) (P_trend = 0.004) than for postmenopausal women (RR 1.10; 95 % CI 0.97-1.25) (P_trend = 0.063). Short-term weight gain during premenopause had a stronger association for ER+/PR- (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 2.19; 95 % CI 1.33-3.61, P = 0.002) and ER-/PR- breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.61; 95 % CI 1.09-2.38, P = 0.016) than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.13; 95 % CI 0.89-1.43, P = 0.32). There are deleterious effects of short-term weight gain, particularly during pre-menopause, even after controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. The association was stronger for ER+/PR- and ER-/PR- than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Channing Division of Network Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, MA, 02115, USA, stbar@channing.harvard.edu.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25796612

Citation

Rosner, Bernard, et al. "Short-term Weight Gain and Breast Cancer Risk By Hormone Receptor Classification Among Pre- and Postmenopausal Women." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 150, no. 3, 2015, pp. 643-53.
Rosner B, Eliassen AH, Toriola AT, et al. Short-term weight gain and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor classification among pre- and postmenopausal women. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2015;150(3):643-53.
Rosner, B., Eliassen, A. H., Toriola, A. T., Hankinson, S. E., Willett, W. C., Natarajan, L., & Colditz, G. A. (2015). Short-term weight gain and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor classification among pre- and postmenopausal women. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 150(3), pp. 643-53. doi:10.1007/s10549-015-3344-0.
Rosner B, et al. Short-term Weight Gain and Breast Cancer Risk By Hormone Receptor Classification Among Pre- and Postmenopausal Women. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2015;150(3):643-53. PubMed PMID: 25796612.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short-term weight gain and breast cancer risk by hormone receptor classification among pre- and postmenopausal women. AU - Rosner,Bernard, AU - Eliassen,A Heather, AU - Toriola,Adetunji T, AU - Hankinson,Susan E, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Natarajan,Loki, AU - Colditz,Graham A, Y1 - 2015/03/22/ PY - 2015/03/05/received PY - 2015/03/11/accepted PY - 2015/3/23/entrez PY - 2015/3/23/pubmed PY - 2016/1/2/medline SP - 643 EP - 53 JF - Breast cancer research and treatment JO - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. VL - 150 IS - 3 N2 - Obesity is well established as a cause of postmenopausal breast cancer incidence and mortality. In contrast, adiposity in early life reduces breast cancer incidence. However, whether short-term weight change influences breast cancer risk is not well known. We followed a cohort of 77,232 women from 1980 to 2006 (1,445,578 person-years), with routinely updated risk factor information, documenting 4196 incident cases of invasive breast cancer. ER and PR status were obtained from pathology reports and medical records yielding a total of 2033 ER+/PR+ tumors, 595 ER-/PR- tumors, 512 ER+/PR- tumors. The log incidence breast cancer model was used to assess the association of short-term weight gain (over past 4 years) while controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. Short-term weight change was significantly associated with breast cancer risk (RR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.09-1.33) for a 4-year weight gain of ≥15 lbs versus no change (≤5 lbs) (P_trend < 0.001). The association was stronger for premenopausal women (RR 1.38; 95 % CI 1.13-1.69) (P_trend = 0.004) than for postmenopausal women (RR 1.10; 95 % CI 0.97-1.25) (P_trend = 0.063). Short-term weight gain during premenopause had a stronger association for ER+/PR- (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 2.19; 95 % CI 1.33-3.61, P = 0.002) and ER-/PR- breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.61; 95 % CI 1.09-2.38, P = 0.016) than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer (RR per 25 lb weight gain = 1.13; 95 % CI 0.89-1.43, P = 0.32). There are deleterious effects of short-term weight gain, particularly during pre-menopause, even after controlling for average BMI before and after menopause. The association was stronger for ER+/PR- and ER-/PR- than for ER+/PR+ breast cancer. SN - 1573-7217 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25796612/Short_term_weight_gain_and_breast_cancer_risk_by_hormone_receptor_classification_among_pre__and_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-015-3344-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -