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In vitro colonic metabolism of coffee and chlorogenic acid results in selective changes in human faecal microbiota growth.
Br J Nutr. 2015 Apr 28; 113(8):1220-7.BJ

Abstract

Coffee is a relatively rich source of chlorogenic acids (CGA), which, as other polyphenols, have been postulated to exert preventive effects against CVD and type 2 diabetes. As a considerable proportion of ingested CGA reaches the large intestine, CGA may be capable of exerting beneficial effects in the large gut. Here, we utilise a stirred, anaerobic, pH-controlled, batch culture fermentation model of the distal region of the colon in order to investigate the impact of coffee and CGA on the growth of the human faecal microbiota. Incubation of coffee samples with the human faecal microbiota led to the rapid metabolism of CGA (4 h) and the production of dihydrocaffeic acid and dihydroferulic acid, while caffeine remained unmetabolised. The coffee with the highest levels of CGA (P<0·05, relative to the other coffees) induced a significant increase in the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. relative to the control vessel at 10 h after exposure (P<0·05). Similarly, an equivalent quantity of CGA (80·8 mg, matched with that in high-CGA coffee) induced a significant increase in the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. (P<0·05). CGA alone also induced a significant increase in the growth of the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group (P<0·05). This selective metabolism and subsequent amplification of specific bacterial populations could be beneficial to host health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Whiteknights,ReadingRG6 6AP,UK.Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Whiteknights,ReadingRG6 6AP,UK.Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Whiteknights,ReadingRG6 6AP,UK.Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Whiteknights,ReadingRG6 6AP,UK.Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Whiteknights,ReadingRG6 6AP,UK.Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences,University of Reading,Whiteknights,ReadingRG6 6AP,UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25809126

Citation

Mills, Charlotte E., et al. "In Vitro Colonic Metabolism of Coffee and Chlorogenic Acid Results in Selective Changes in Human Faecal Microbiota Growth." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 113, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1220-7.
Mills CE, Tzounis X, Oruna-Concha MJ, et al. In vitro colonic metabolism of coffee and chlorogenic acid results in selective changes in human faecal microbiota growth. Br J Nutr. 2015;113(8):1220-7.
Mills, C. E., Tzounis, X., Oruna-Concha, M. J., Mottram, D. S., Gibson, G. R., & Spencer, J. P. (2015). In vitro colonic metabolism of coffee and chlorogenic acid results in selective changes in human faecal microbiota growth. The British Journal of Nutrition, 113(8), 1220-7. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114514003948
Mills CE, et al. In Vitro Colonic Metabolism of Coffee and Chlorogenic Acid Results in Selective Changes in Human Faecal Microbiota Growth. Br J Nutr. 2015 Apr 28;113(8):1220-7. PubMed PMID: 25809126.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro colonic metabolism of coffee and chlorogenic acid results in selective changes in human faecal microbiota growth. AU - Mills,Charlotte E, AU - Tzounis,Xenofon, AU - Oruna-Concha,Maria-Jose, AU - Mottram,Don S, AU - Gibson,Glenn R, AU - Spencer,Jeremy P E, Y1 - 2015/03/26/ PY - 2015/3/27/entrez PY - 2015/3/27/pubmed PY - 2015/6/30/medline KW - Chlorogenic acids SP - 1220 EP - 7 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br J Nutr VL - 113 IS - 8 N2 - Coffee is a relatively rich source of chlorogenic acids (CGA), which, as other polyphenols, have been postulated to exert preventive effects against CVD and type 2 diabetes. As a considerable proportion of ingested CGA reaches the large intestine, CGA may be capable of exerting beneficial effects in the large gut. Here, we utilise a stirred, anaerobic, pH-controlled, batch culture fermentation model of the distal region of the colon in order to investigate the impact of coffee and CGA on the growth of the human faecal microbiota. Incubation of coffee samples with the human faecal microbiota led to the rapid metabolism of CGA (4 h) and the production of dihydrocaffeic acid and dihydroferulic acid, while caffeine remained unmetabolised. The coffee with the highest levels of CGA (P<0·05, relative to the other coffees) induced a significant increase in the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. relative to the control vessel at 10 h after exposure (P<0·05). Similarly, an equivalent quantity of CGA (80·8 mg, matched with that in high-CGA coffee) induced a significant increase in the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. (P<0·05). CGA alone also induced a significant increase in the growth of the Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale group (P<0·05). This selective metabolism and subsequent amplification of specific bacterial populations could be beneficial to host health. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25809126/In_vitro_colonic_metabolism_of_coffee_and_chlorogenic_acid_results_in_selective_changes_in_human_faecal_microbiota_growth_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114514003948/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -