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Folate pathway gene polymorphisms and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case-control study.
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015 Jun; 24(6):931-7.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Recent research suggests that maternal folic acid supplementation is associated with a reduced risk of childhood brain tumors (CBT); polymorphisms in folate pathway genes could modify this association or directly influence CBT risk.

METHODS

Associations between risk of CBT and folate pathway polymorphisms were investigated in a population-based case-control study in Australia (2005-2010). Cases were recruited through all Australian pediatric oncology centers and controls by national random digit dialing. Data were available from 321 cases and 552 controls. Six polymorphisms were genotyped in children and parents (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, MTRR 66A>G, MTR 2756A>G, MTR 5049C>A, and CBS 2199 T>C). Maternal folic acid use was ascertained via questionnaire. ORs were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Case-parent trio analyses were also undertaken.

RESULTS

There was weak evidence of a reduced risk of CBT for the MTRR 66GG genotype in the child or father: ORs 0.71 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.48-1.07]; 0.54 (95% CI, 0.34-0.87), respectively. Maternal prepregnancy folic acid supplementation showed a stronger negative association with CBT risk where the child, mother, or father had the MTRR 66GG genotype (Pinteraction = 0.07, 0.10, and 0.18, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS

Evidence for an association between folate pathway genotypes and CBT is limited in this study. There was possible protection by the MTRR 66GG genotype, particularly when combined with maternal prepregnancy folic acid supplementation; these results are novel and require replication.

IMPACT

The possible interaction between folic acid supplementation and MTRR 66A>G, if confirmed, would strengthen evidence for prepregnancy folate protection against CBT.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.Hunter Medical Research Institute, John Hunter Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. School of Biomedical Sciences and Pharmacy, Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia. Hunter Area Pathology Service, HNEHealth, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.Hunter Medical Research Institute, John Hunter Hospital, New South Wales, Australia. School of Medicine and Public Health, Faculty of Health and Medicine, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Children's Cancer Institute Australia for Medical Research, Lowy Cancer Research Centre, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.School of Surgery, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Department of Paediatric Oncology/Haematology, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Perth, Western Australia, Australia.Research Portfolio, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia. School of Women's and Children's Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia.Sax Institute, Haymarket, New South Wales, Australia. Sydney School of Public Health, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.Telethon Kids Institute, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Liz.Milne@telethonkids.org.au.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25809864

Citation

Greenop, Kathryn R., et al. "Folate Pathway Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Childhood Brain Tumors: Results From an Australian Case-control Study." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 24, no. 6, 2015, pp. 931-7.
Greenop KR, Scott RJ, Attia J, et al. Folate pathway gene polymorphisms and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case-control study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015;24(6):931-7.
Greenop, K. R., Scott, R. J., Attia, J., Bower, C., de Klerk, N. H., Norris, M. D., Haber, M., Jamieson, S. E., van Bockxmeer, F. M., Gottardo, N. G., Ashton, L. J., Armstrong, B. K., & Milne, E. (2015). Folate pathway gene polymorphisms and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case-control study. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 24(6), 931-7. https://doi.org/10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-14-1248
Greenop KR, et al. Folate Pathway Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Childhood Brain Tumors: Results From an Australian Case-control Study. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2015;24(6):931-7. PubMed PMID: 25809864.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Folate pathway gene polymorphisms and risk of childhood brain tumors: results from an Australian case-control study. AU - Greenop,Kathryn R, AU - Scott,Rodney J, AU - Attia,John, AU - Bower,Carol, AU - de Klerk,Nicholas H, AU - Norris,Murray D, AU - Haber,Michelle, AU - Jamieson,Sarra E, AU - van Bockxmeer,Frank M, AU - Gottardo,Nicholas G, AU - Ashton,Lesley J, AU - Armstrong,Bruce K, AU - Milne,Elizabeth, Y1 - 2015/03/25/ PY - 2014/11/06/received PY - 2015/03/12/accepted PY - 2015/3/27/entrez PY - 2015/3/27/pubmed PY - 2016/2/26/medline SP - 931 EP - 7 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev VL - 24 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Recent research suggests that maternal folic acid supplementation is associated with a reduced risk of childhood brain tumors (CBT); polymorphisms in folate pathway genes could modify this association or directly influence CBT risk. METHODS: Associations between risk of CBT and folate pathway polymorphisms were investigated in a population-based case-control study in Australia (2005-2010). Cases were recruited through all Australian pediatric oncology centers and controls by national random digit dialing. Data were available from 321 cases and 552 controls. Six polymorphisms were genotyped in children and parents (MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C, MTRR 66A>G, MTR 2756A>G, MTR 5049C>A, and CBS 2199 T>C). Maternal folic acid use was ascertained via questionnaire. ORs were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Case-parent trio analyses were also undertaken. RESULTS: There was weak evidence of a reduced risk of CBT for the MTRR 66GG genotype in the child or father: ORs 0.71 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.48-1.07]; 0.54 (95% CI, 0.34-0.87), respectively. Maternal prepregnancy folic acid supplementation showed a stronger negative association with CBT risk where the child, mother, or father had the MTRR 66GG genotype (Pinteraction = 0.07, 0.10, and 0.18, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Evidence for an association between folate pathway genotypes and CBT is limited in this study. There was possible protection by the MTRR 66GG genotype, particularly when combined with maternal prepregnancy folic acid supplementation; these results are novel and require replication. IMPACT: The possible interaction between folic acid supplementation and MTRR 66A>G, if confirmed, would strengthen evidence for prepregnancy folate protection against CBT. SN - 1538-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25809864/Folate_pathway_gene_polymorphisms_and_risk_of_childhood_brain_tumors:_results_from_an_Australian_case_control_study_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25809864 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -