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Fish consumption, long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis.
Nutrients 2015; 7(4):2085-100N

Abstract

Fish and long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCω3PUFA) intake in relation to the risk of cardiovascular diseases have been well studied. However, studies that directly link fish consumption or LCω3PUFA intake to the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are sparse and the results are inconsistent. We reviewed literature through December 2014 and used random-effects or fixed-effects models, as appropriate, to pool the associations of fish or LCω3PUFA intake with the risk of MetS. Nine independent cross-sectional samples (seven cross-sectional studies) and three independent prospective cohorts (two prospective cohort studies) were identified as eligible for this meta-analysis. By pooling data from the prospective cohorts (7860 participants and 1671 incident cases), a significant inverse association between fish consumption and incidence of MetS was found. The pooled RR (95% CI) was 0.71 (0.58, 0.87), comparing the highest to the lowest category of fish consumption, and 0.94 (0.90, 0.98) for one serving/week increment. Consistent results were found for LCω3PUFA intake. Non-significant inverse association of fish or LCω3PUFA intake with risk of MetS was found when pooling the cross-sectional studies. By quantitatively summarizing the literature, a modest inverse association between fish or LCω3PUFA intake and risk of MetS cannot be excluded.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health-Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. harrison72@dumc.or.kr. Department of Medicine, Graduate School, Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul, 100-715, Korea. harrison72@dumc.or.kr.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health-Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. pxun@indiana.edu.Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health-Bloomington, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405, USA. kahe@indiana.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25811108

Citation

Kim, Yong-Seok, et al. "Fish Consumption, Long-chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: a Meta-analysis." Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 4, 2015, pp. 2085-100.
Kim YS, Xun P, He K. Fish consumption, long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis. Nutrients. 2015;7(4):2085-100.
Kim, Y. S., Xun, P., & He, K. (2015). Fish consumption, long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis. Nutrients, 7(4), pp. 2085-100. doi:10.3390/nu7042085.
Kim YS, Xun P, He K. Fish Consumption, Long-chain Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Intake and Risk of Metabolic Syndrome: a Meta-analysis. Nutrients. 2015 Mar 24;7(4):2085-100. PubMed PMID: 25811108.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Fish consumption, long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid intake and risk of metabolic syndrome: a meta-analysis. AU - Kim,Yong-Seok, AU - Xun,Pengcheng, AU - He,Ka, Y1 - 2015/03/24/ PY - 2015/02/04/received PY - 2015/03/13/revised PY - 2015/03/17/accepted PY - 2015/3/27/entrez PY - 2015/3/27/pubmed PY - 2016/1/28/medline SP - 2085 EP - 100 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 7 IS - 4 N2 - Fish and long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCω3PUFA) intake in relation to the risk of cardiovascular diseases have been well studied. However, studies that directly link fish consumption or LCω3PUFA intake to the risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS) are sparse and the results are inconsistent. We reviewed literature through December 2014 and used random-effects or fixed-effects models, as appropriate, to pool the associations of fish or LCω3PUFA intake with the risk of MetS. Nine independent cross-sectional samples (seven cross-sectional studies) and three independent prospective cohorts (two prospective cohort studies) were identified as eligible for this meta-analysis. By pooling data from the prospective cohorts (7860 participants and 1671 incident cases), a significant inverse association between fish consumption and incidence of MetS was found. The pooled RR (95% CI) was 0.71 (0.58, 0.87), comparing the highest to the lowest category of fish consumption, and 0.94 (0.90, 0.98) for one serving/week increment. Consistent results were found for LCω3PUFA intake. Non-significant inverse association of fish or LCω3PUFA intake with risk of MetS was found when pooling the cross-sectional studies. By quantitatively summarizing the literature, a modest inverse association between fish or LCω3PUFA intake and risk of MetS cannot be excluded. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25811108/Fish_consumption_long_chain_omega_3_polyunsaturated_fatty_acid_intake_and_risk_of_metabolic_syndrome:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - http://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu7042085 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -