Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Iron, inflammation and atherosclerosis risk in men vs. perimenopausal women.
Atherosclerosis 2015; 241(1):249-54A

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Age at first atherosclerotic event is typically older for women vs. men; monthly iron loss has been postulated to contribute to this advantage. We investigated the relationship between an MRI-based arterial wall biomarker and the serum inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in perimenopausal women vs. men.

METHODS AND RESULTS

Women without evident atherosclerotic disease were prospectively enrolled and observed over 24 months of menopause transition, indicated by hormone levels and reduction in median number of menstrual cycles from 4 [3-6] per year to 0 [0-1] per year (P < 0.01). Higher hsCRP predicted shorter carotid artery wall T2* in women entering the menopause transition (r = -0.3139, P = 0.0014); this relationship weakened after 24 months of perimenopause in women (r = -0.1718, P = 0.0859) and was not significant in a cohort of men matched for age and cardiovascular risk category (r = -0.0310, P = 0.8362). Serum ferritin increased from baseline to 24-month follow-up during women's menopause transition (37 [20-79] to 67 [36-97] ng/mL, P < 0.01), but still remained lower compared to men (111 [45-220] ng/mL, P < 0.01). Circulating ferritin levels correlated with arterial wall T2* values in women at baseline (r = -0.3163, P = 0.0013) but not in women after 24 months (r = -0.0730, P = 0.4684) of menopause transition nor in men (r = 0.0862, P = 0.5644).

CONCLUSIONS

An arterial wall iron-based imaging biomarker reflects degree of systemic inflammation in younger women, whereas this relationship is lost as women transition through menopause to become more similar to men. Iron homeostasis and inflammation in the arterial wall microenvironment warrants further investigation as a potential early target for interventions that mitigate atherosclerosis risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Electronic address: raman.1@osu.edu.Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.University of Maryland, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, 2234H SPH Building, College Park, MD 20742, USA.Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.OSU, Department of Family Medicine, 2231 N. High St, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.Ohio State University (OSU), Davis Heart and Lung Research Institute, 473 W. 12th Ave, Suite 200, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.OSU, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, 1581 Dodd Drive, Columbus, OH 43210, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25817132

Citation

Raman, Subha V., et al. "Iron, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis Risk in Men Vs. Perimenopausal Women." Atherosclerosis, vol. 241, no. 1, 2015, pp. 249-54.
Raman SV, Sharkey-Toppen TP, Tran T, et al. Iron, inflammation and atherosclerosis risk in men vs. perimenopausal women. Atherosclerosis. 2015;241(1):249-54.
Raman, S. V., Sharkey-Toppen, T. P., Tran, T., Liu, J. X., McCarthy, B., He, X., ... Jackson, R. D. (2015). Iron, inflammation and atherosclerosis risk in men vs. perimenopausal women. Atherosclerosis, 241(1), pp. 249-54. doi:10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2015.03.032.
Raman SV, et al. Iron, Inflammation and Atherosclerosis Risk in Men Vs. Perimenopausal Women. Atherosclerosis. 2015;241(1):249-54. PubMed PMID: 25817132.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Iron, inflammation and atherosclerosis risk in men vs. perimenopausal women. AU - Raman,Subha V, AU - Sharkey-Toppen,Travis P, AU - Tran,Tam, AU - Liu,Jim X, AU - McCarthy,Beth, AU - He,Xin, AU - Smart,Suzanne, AU - Gulati,Martha, AU - Wexler,Randell, AU - Simonetti,Orlando P, AU - Jackson,Rebecca D, Y1 - 2015/03/20/ PY - 2015/01/21/received PY - 2015/02/15/revised PY - 2015/03/16/accepted PY - 2015/3/31/entrez PY - 2015/3/31/pubmed PY - 2016/3/10/medline KW - Atherosclerosis KW - Iron KW - Magnetic resonance imaging KW - Risk factors KW - Women SP - 249 EP - 54 JF - Atherosclerosis JO - Atherosclerosis VL - 241 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Age at first atherosclerotic event is typically older for women vs. men; monthly iron loss has been postulated to contribute to this advantage. We investigated the relationship between an MRI-based arterial wall biomarker and the serum inflammatory biomarker high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in perimenopausal women vs. men. METHODS AND RESULTS: Women without evident atherosclerotic disease were prospectively enrolled and observed over 24 months of menopause transition, indicated by hormone levels and reduction in median number of menstrual cycles from 4 [3-6] per year to 0 [0-1] per year (P < 0.01). Higher hsCRP predicted shorter carotid artery wall T2* in women entering the menopause transition (r = -0.3139, P = 0.0014); this relationship weakened after 24 months of perimenopause in women (r = -0.1718, P = 0.0859) and was not significant in a cohort of men matched for age and cardiovascular risk category (r = -0.0310, P = 0.8362). Serum ferritin increased from baseline to 24-month follow-up during women's menopause transition (37 [20-79] to 67 [36-97] ng/mL, P < 0.01), but still remained lower compared to men (111 [45-220] ng/mL, P < 0.01). Circulating ferritin levels correlated with arterial wall T2* values in women at baseline (r = -0.3163, P = 0.0013) but not in women after 24 months (r = -0.0730, P = 0.4684) of menopause transition nor in men (r = 0.0862, P = 0.5644). CONCLUSIONS: An arterial wall iron-based imaging biomarker reflects degree of systemic inflammation in younger women, whereas this relationship is lost as women transition through menopause to become more similar to men. Iron homeostasis and inflammation in the arterial wall microenvironment warrants further investigation as a potential early target for interventions that mitigate atherosclerosis risk. SN - 1879-1484 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25817132/Iron_inflammation_and_atherosclerosis_risk_in_men_vs__perimenopausal_women_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0021-9150(15)00192-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -