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Characterizing human vestibular sensory epithelia for experimental studies: new hair bundles on old tissue and implications for therapeutic interventions in ageing.
Neurobiol Aging 2015; 36(6):2068-84NA

Abstract

Balance disequilibrium is a significant contributor to falls in the elderly. The most common cause of balance dysfunction is loss of sensory cells from the vestibular sensory epithelia of the inner ear. However, inaccessibility of inner ear tissue in humans severely restricts possibilities for experimental manipulation to develop therapies to ameliorate this loss. We provide a structural and functional analysis of human vestibular sensory epithelia harvested at trans-labyrinthine surgery. We demonstrate the viability of the tissue and labeling with specific markers of hair cell function and of ion homeostasis in the epithelium. Samples obtained from the oldest patients revealed a significant loss of hair cells across the tissue surface, but we found immature hair bundles present in epithelia harvested from patients >60 years of age. These results suggest that the environment of the human vestibular sensory epithelium could be responsive to stimulation of developmental pathways to enhance hair cell regeneration, as has been demonstrated successfully in the vestibular organs of adult mice.

Authors+Show Affiliations

UCL Ear Institute, London, UK. Electronic address: ruth.r.taylor@ucl.ac.uk.UCL Ear Institute, London, UK.UCL Ear Institute, London, UK; Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London, UK.Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, Birmingham, UK.Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, Birmingham, UK.Queen Elizabeth Hospital, University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre, Birmingham, UK.Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Manchester, UK; Salford Royal Infirmary, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK.Manchester Royal Infirmary, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Trust, Manchester, UK; Salford Royal Infirmary, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK.UCL Ear Institute, London, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25818177

Citation

Taylor, Ruth R., et al. "Characterizing Human Vestibular Sensory Epithelia for Experimental Studies: New Hair Bundles On Old Tissue and Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Ageing." Neurobiology of Aging, vol. 36, no. 6, 2015, pp. 2068-84.
Taylor RR, Jagger DJ, Saeed SR, et al. Characterizing human vestibular sensory epithelia for experimental studies: new hair bundles on old tissue and implications for therapeutic interventions in ageing. Neurobiol Aging. 2015;36(6):2068-84.
Taylor, R. R., Jagger, D. J., Saeed, S. R., Axon, P., Donnelly, N., Tysome, J., ... Forge, A. (2015). Characterizing human vestibular sensory epithelia for experimental studies: new hair bundles on old tissue and implications for therapeutic interventions in ageing. Neurobiology of Aging, 36(6), pp. 2068-84. doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2015.02.013.
Taylor RR, et al. Characterizing Human Vestibular Sensory Epithelia for Experimental Studies: New Hair Bundles On Old Tissue and Implications for Therapeutic Interventions in Ageing. Neurobiol Aging. 2015;36(6):2068-84. PubMed PMID: 25818177.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Characterizing human vestibular sensory epithelia for experimental studies: new hair bundles on old tissue and implications for therapeutic interventions in ageing. AU - Taylor,Ruth R, AU - Jagger,Daniel J, AU - Saeed,Shakeel R, AU - Axon,Patrick, AU - Donnelly,Neil, AU - Tysome,James, AU - Moffatt,David, AU - Irving,Richard, AU - Monksfield,Peter, AU - Coulson,Chris, AU - Freeman,Simon R, AU - Lloyd,Simon K, AU - Forge,Andrew, Y1 - 2015/02/17/ PY - 2014/12/08/received PY - 2015/02/09/revised PY - 2015/02/11/accepted PY - 2015/3/31/entrez PY - 2015/3/31/pubmed PY - 2016/3/18/medline KW - Aging pathologies KW - Hair cells KW - Human vestibular KW - Stereocilia KW - Supporting cells KW - Utricle SP - 2068 EP - 84 JF - Neurobiology of aging JO - Neurobiol. Aging VL - 36 IS - 6 N2 - Balance disequilibrium is a significant contributor to falls in the elderly. The most common cause of balance dysfunction is loss of sensory cells from the vestibular sensory epithelia of the inner ear. However, inaccessibility of inner ear tissue in humans severely restricts possibilities for experimental manipulation to develop therapies to ameliorate this loss. We provide a structural and functional analysis of human vestibular sensory epithelia harvested at trans-labyrinthine surgery. We demonstrate the viability of the tissue and labeling with specific markers of hair cell function and of ion homeostasis in the epithelium. Samples obtained from the oldest patients revealed a significant loss of hair cells across the tissue surface, but we found immature hair bundles present in epithelia harvested from patients >60 years of age. These results suggest that the environment of the human vestibular sensory epithelium could be responsive to stimulation of developmental pathways to enhance hair cell regeneration, as has been demonstrated successfully in the vestibular organs of adult mice. SN - 1558-1497 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25818177/Characterizing_human_vestibular_sensory_epithelia_for_experimental_studies:_new_hair_bundles_on_old_tissue_and_implications_for_therapeutic_interventions_in_ageing_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0197-4580(15)00113-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -