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Do all components of the metabolic syndrome cluster together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results from the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos.
Ann Epidemiol. 2015 Jul; 25(7):480-5.AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Metabolic syndrome (MetS), the clustering of several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is highly prevalent in Hispanics/Latinos. We tested whether all components significantly loaded on the syndrome in Hispanics/Latinos and whether their contribution differed by sex and Hispanic ancestry. We also examined associations of MetS with prevalent diabetes and coronary heart disease in Hispanics/Latinos.

METHODS

Data were obtained from a population-based cohort of n = 15,823 participants in the HCHS/SOL study who self-identified as being of Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican American, Puerto Rican, or South American ancestry and were aged 18 to 74 years at screening.

RESULTS

A latent variable model of waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and fasting glucose fit the data in men and women, but the contribution of HDL-C was weak. No difference in the latent model of MetS was detected across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups. MetS was significantly associated with diabetes and coronary heart disease.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results indicate that similar criteria for MetS may be applied across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups but call into question the role of HDL-C in classifying the MetS in Hispanics/Latinos.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL. Electronic address: mllabre@miami.edu.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Institute for Minority Health Research, College of Medicine, University of Illinois, Chicago, IL.Department of Family and Social Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY.Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, Department of Biostatistics, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL.Department of Health Promotion/Behavioral Science, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Institute for Behavioral and Community Health, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Department of Psychology, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA.Department of Epidemiology, Gillings School of Global Public Health, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25818844

Citation

Llabre, Maria M., et al. "Do All Components of the Metabolic Syndrome Cluster Together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results From the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 25, no. 7, 2015, pp. 480-5.
Llabre MM, Arguelles W, Schneiderman N, et al. Do all components of the metabolic syndrome cluster together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results from the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos. Ann Epidemiol. 2015;25(7):480-5.
Llabre, M. M., Arguelles, W., Schneiderman, N., Gallo, L. C., Daviglus, M. L., Chambers, E. C., Sotres-Alvarez, D., Chirinos, D. A., Talavera, G. A., Castaneda, S. F., Roesch, S. C., & Heiss, G. (2015). Do all components of the metabolic syndrome cluster together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results from the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos. Annals of Epidemiology, 25(7), 480-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annepidem.2015.02.010
Llabre MM, et al. Do All Components of the Metabolic Syndrome Cluster Together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results From the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos. Ann Epidemiol. 2015;25(7):480-5. PubMed PMID: 25818844.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do all components of the metabolic syndrome cluster together in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos? Results from the Hispanic Community Health study/Study of Latinos. AU - Llabre,Maria M, AU - Arguelles,William, AU - Schneiderman,Neil, AU - Gallo,Linda C, AU - Daviglus,Martha L, AU - Chambers,Earle C, AU - Sotres-Alvarez,Daniela, AU - Chirinos,Diana A, AU - Talavera,Gregory A, AU - Castaneda,Sheila F, AU - Roesch,Scott C, AU - Heiss,Gerardo, Y1 - 2015/02/19/ PY - 2014/09/10/received PY - 2015/02/03/revised PY - 2015/02/16/accepted PY - 2015/3/31/entrez PY - 2015/3/31/pubmed PY - 2016/3/5/medline KW - Hispanics KW - Lipids KW - Metabolic syndrome SP - 480 EP - 5 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 25 IS - 7 N2 - PURPOSE: Metabolic syndrome (MetS), the clustering of several risk factors for cardiovascular disease, is highly prevalent in Hispanics/Latinos. We tested whether all components significantly loaded on the syndrome in Hispanics/Latinos and whether their contribution differed by sex and Hispanic ancestry. We also examined associations of MetS with prevalent diabetes and coronary heart disease in Hispanics/Latinos. METHODS: Data were obtained from a population-based cohort of n = 15,823 participants in the HCHS/SOL study who self-identified as being of Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican American, Puerto Rican, or South American ancestry and were aged 18 to 74 years at screening. RESULTS: A latent variable model of waist circumference, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and fasting glucose fit the data in men and women, but the contribution of HDL-C was weak. No difference in the latent model of MetS was detected across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups. MetS was significantly associated with diabetes and coronary heart disease. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate that similar criteria for MetS may be applied across Hispanic/Latino ancestry groups but call into question the role of HDL-C in classifying the MetS in Hispanics/Latinos. SN - 1873-2585 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25818844/Do_all_components_of_the_metabolic_syndrome_cluster_together_in_U_S__Hispanics/Latinos_Results_from_the_Hispanic_Community_Health_study/Study_of_Latinos_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(15)00056-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -