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Diversity of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26:H11 Strains Examined via stx Subtypes and Insertion Sites of Stx and EspK Bacteriophages.
Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015 Jun; 81(11):3712-21.AE

Abstract

Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a food-borne pathogen that may be responsible for severe human infections. Only a limited number of serotypes, including O26:H11, are involved in the majority of serious cases and outbreaks. The main virulence factors, Shiga toxins (Stx), are encoded by bacteriophages. Seventy-four STEC O26:H11 strains of various origins (including human, dairy, and cattle) were characterized for their stx subtypes and Stx phage chromosomal insertion sites. The majority of food and cattle strains possessed the stx(1a) subtype, while human strains carried mainly stx(1a) or stx(2a). The wrbA and yehV genes were the main Stx phage insertion sites in STEC O26:H11, followed distantly by yecE and sbcB. Interestingly, the occurrence of Stx phages inserted in the yecE gene was low in dairy strains. In most of the 29 stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 strains also studied here, these bacterial insertion sites were vacant. Multilocus sequence typing of 20 stx-positive or stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 strains showed that they were distributed into two phylogenetic groups defined by sequence type 21 (ST21) and ST29. Finally, an EspK-carrying phage was found inserted in the ssrA gene in the majority of the STEC O26:H11 strains but in only a minority of the stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 strains. The differences in the stx subtypes and Stx phage insertion sites observed in STEC O26:H11 according to their origin might reflect that strains circulating in cattle and foods are clonally distinct from those isolated from human patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université Paris-Est, Anses, Laboratory for Food Safety, Department of Microbiology, Maisons-Alfort, France ACTALIA Produits Laitiers, Laboratoire de Microbiologie d'Intérêt Laitier, La Roche sur Foron, France.Université de Lyon, VetAgro Sup, Laboratoire d'Études des Microorganismes Alimentaires Pathogènes/Laboratoire National de Référence pour les Escherichia coli y Compris les E. coli Producteurs de Shiga-Toxines, Marcy l'Etoile, France Université de Lyon, UMR 5557 Ecologie Microbienne, Université Lyon 1, CNRS, VetAgro Sup, Equipe Bactéries Pathogènes et Opportunistes, Villeurbanne, France.Associated-National Reference Center for Escherichia coli, AP-HP, Service de Microbiologie, Hôpital Robert-Debré, Paris, France.INSERM UMR1043/CNRS UMR5282/Université Toulouse III, Centre de Physiopathologie de Toulouse Purpan (CPTP), Toulouse, France.Université Paris-Est, Anses, Laboratory for Food Safety, Department of Microbiology, Maisons-Alfort, France.ACTALIA Produits Laitiers, Laboratoire de Microbiologie d'Intérêt Laitier, La Roche sur Foron, France.Université Paris-Est, Anses, Laboratory for Food Safety, Department of Microbiology, Maisons-Alfort, France frederic.auvray@anses.fr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25819955

Citation

Bonanno, Ludivine, et al. "Diversity of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli (STEC) O26:H11 Strains Examined Via Stx Subtypes and Insertion Sites of Stx and EspK Bacteriophages." Applied and Environmental Microbiology, vol. 81, no. 11, 2015, pp. 3712-21.
Bonanno L, Loukiadis E, Mariani-Kurkdjian P, et al. Diversity of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26:H11 Strains Examined via stx Subtypes and Insertion Sites of Stx and EspK Bacteriophages. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015;81(11):3712-21.
Bonanno, L., Loukiadis, E., Mariani-Kurkdjian, P., Oswald, E., Garnier, L., Michel, V., & Auvray, F. (2015). Diversity of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26:H11 Strains Examined via stx Subtypes and Insertion Sites of Stx and EspK Bacteriophages. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 81(11), 3712-21. https://doi.org/10.1128/AEM.00077-15
Bonanno L, et al. Diversity of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia Coli (STEC) O26:H11 Strains Examined Via Stx Subtypes and Insertion Sites of Stx and EspK Bacteriophages. Appl Environ Microbiol. 2015;81(11):3712-21. PubMed PMID: 25819955.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diversity of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli (STEC) O26:H11 Strains Examined via stx Subtypes and Insertion Sites of Stx and EspK Bacteriophages. AU - Bonanno,Ludivine, AU - Loukiadis,Estelle, AU - Mariani-Kurkdjian,Patricia, AU - Oswald,Eric, AU - Garnier,Lucille, AU - Michel,Valérie, AU - Auvray,Frédéric, Y1 - 2015/03/27/ PY - 2015/01/09/received PY - 2015/03/13/accepted PY - 2015/3/31/entrez PY - 2015/3/31/pubmed PY - 2016/1/26/medline SP - 3712 EP - 21 JF - Applied and environmental microbiology JO - Appl Environ Microbiol VL - 81 IS - 11 N2 - Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) is a food-borne pathogen that may be responsible for severe human infections. Only a limited number of serotypes, including O26:H11, are involved in the majority of serious cases and outbreaks. The main virulence factors, Shiga toxins (Stx), are encoded by bacteriophages. Seventy-four STEC O26:H11 strains of various origins (including human, dairy, and cattle) were characterized for their stx subtypes and Stx phage chromosomal insertion sites. The majority of food and cattle strains possessed the stx(1a) subtype, while human strains carried mainly stx(1a) or stx(2a). The wrbA and yehV genes were the main Stx phage insertion sites in STEC O26:H11, followed distantly by yecE and sbcB. Interestingly, the occurrence of Stx phages inserted in the yecE gene was low in dairy strains. In most of the 29 stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 strains also studied here, these bacterial insertion sites were vacant. Multilocus sequence typing of 20 stx-positive or stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 strains showed that they were distributed into two phylogenetic groups defined by sequence type 21 (ST21) and ST29. Finally, an EspK-carrying phage was found inserted in the ssrA gene in the majority of the STEC O26:H11 strains but in only a minority of the stx-negative E. coli O26:H11 strains. The differences in the stx subtypes and Stx phage insertion sites observed in STEC O26:H11 according to their origin might reflect that strains circulating in cattle and foods are clonally distinct from those isolated from human patients. SN - 1098-5336 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25819955/Diversity_of_Shiga_Toxin_Producing_Escherichia_coli__STEC__O26:H11_Strains_Examined_via_stx_Subtypes_and_Insertion_Sites_of_Stx_and_EspK_Bacteriophages_ L2 - http://aem.asm.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=25819955 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -