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Cardiovascular reactivity, mood, and task performance in deprived and nondeprived coffee drinkers.
Health Psychol 1989; 8(4):427-47HP

Abstract

Forty habitual, heavy coffee drinkers (M = 5.7 cups/day) participated in two experimental sessions. Participants were deprived of their morning coffee for one of the laboratory sessions, not deprived the other. During each session, subjects consumed 12 oz of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or caffeine-free herbal tea. Measurements of heart rate, blood pressure, mood, and catecholamine response to deprivation and consumption of the beverage, alone and in combination with challenging tasks, were made. This study found that caffeine continues to cause blood pressure increases with chronic, heavy consumption and that these effects do not appear to habituate with regular use. Subjects reacted to behavioral challenge with fewer negative mood effects if they had consumed caffeine or coffee. Mild caffeine deprivation was associated with symptoms of stress.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD 20814-4799.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2583079

Citation

Ratliff-Crain, J, et al. "Cardiovascular Reactivity, Mood, and Task Performance in Deprived and Nondeprived Coffee Drinkers." Health Psychology : Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, vol. 8, no. 4, 1989, pp. 427-47.
Ratliff-Crain J, O'Keeffe MK, Baum A. Cardiovascular reactivity, mood, and task performance in deprived and nondeprived coffee drinkers. Health Psychol. 1989;8(4):427-47.
Ratliff-Crain, J., O'Keeffe, M. K., & Baum, A. (1989). Cardiovascular reactivity, mood, and task performance in deprived and nondeprived coffee drinkers. Health Psychology : Official Journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association, 8(4), pp. 427-47.
Ratliff-Crain J, O'Keeffe MK, Baum A. Cardiovascular Reactivity, Mood, and Task Performance in Deprived and Nondeprived Coffee Drinkers. Health Psychol. 1989;8(4):427-47. PubMed PMID: 2583079.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cardiovascular reactivity, mood, and task performance in deprived and nondeprived coffee drinkers. AU - Ratliff-Crain,J, AU - O'Keeffe,M K, AU - Baum,A, PY - 1989/1/1/pubmed PY - 1989/1/1/medline PY - 1989/1/1/entrez SP - 427 EP - 47 JF - Health psychology : official journal of the Division of Health Psychology, American Psychological Association JO - Health Psychol VL - 8 IS - 4 N2 - Forty habitual, heavy coffee drinkers (M = 5.7 cups/day) participated in two experimental sessions. Participants were deprived of their morning coffee for one of the laboratory sessions, not deprived the other. During each session, subjects consumed 12 oz of caffeinated coffee, decaffeinated coffee, or caffeine-free herbal tea. Measurements of heart rate, blood pressure, mood, and catecholamine response to deprivation and consumption of the beverage, alone and in combination with challenging tasks, were made. This study found that caffeine continues to cause blood pressure increases with chronic, heavy consumption and that these effects do not appear to habituate with regular use. Subjects reacted to behavioral challenge with fewer negative mood effects if they had consumed caffeine or coffee. Mild caffeine deprivation was associated with symptoms of stress. SN - 0278-6133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2583079/Cardiovascular_reactivity_mood_and_task_performance_in_deprived_and_nondeprived_coffee_drinkers_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=2583079.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -