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Do you really represent my task? Sequential adaptation effects to unexpected events support referential coding for the joint Simon effect.
Psychol Res. 2016 Jul; 80(4):449-63.PR

Abstract

Recent findings suggest that a Simon effect (SE) can be induced in Individual go/nogo tasks when responding next to an event-producing object salient enough to provide a reference for the spatial coding of one's own action. However, there is skepticism against referential coding for the joint Simon effect (JSE) by proponents of task co-representation. In the present study, we tested assumptions of task co-representation and referential coding by introducing unexpected double response events in a joint go/nogo and a joint independent go/nogo task. In Experiment 1b, we tested if task representations are functionally similar in joint and standard Simon tasks. In Experiment 2, we tested sequential updating of task co-representation after unexpected single response events in the joint independent go/nogo task. Results showed increased JSEs following unexpected events in the joint go/nogo and joint independent go/nogo task (Experiment 1a). While the former finding is in line with the assumptions made by both accounts (task co-representation and referential coding), the latter finding supports referential coding. In contrast to Experiment 1a, we found a decreased SE after unexpected events in the standard Simon task (Experiment 1b), providing evidence against the functional equivalence assumption between joint and two-choice Simon tasks of the task co-representation account. Finally, we found an increased JSE also following unexpected single response events (Experiment 2), ruling out that the findings of the joint independent go/nogo task in Experiment 1a were due to a re-conceptualization of the task situation. In conclusion, our findings support referential coding also for the joint Simon effect.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Junior Group "Neurocognition of Joint Action", Institute for Psychology, University of Muenster, Fliednerstraβe 21, 48149, Muenster, Germany. b.klempova@uni-muenster.de.Junior Group "Neurocognition of Joint Action", Institute for Psychology, University of Muenster, Fliednerstraβe 21, 48149, Muenster, Germany. roman.liepelt@uni-muenster.de.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25833374

Citation

Klempova, Bibiana, and Roman Liepelt. "Do You Really Represent My Task? Sequential Adaptation Effects to Unexpected Events Support Referential Coding for the Joint Simon Effect." Psychological Research, vol. 80, no. 4, 2016, pp. 449-63.
Klempova B, Liepelt R. Do you really represent my task? Sequential adaptation effects to unexpected events support referential coding for the joint Simon effect. Psychol Res. 2016;80(4):449-63.
Klempova, B., & Liepelt, R. (2016). Do you really represent my task? Sequential adaptation effects to unexpected events support referential coding for the joint Simon effect. Psychological Research, 80(4), 449-63. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-015-0664-y
Klempova B, Liepelt R. Do You Really Represent My Task? Sequential Adaptation Effects to Unexpected Events Support Referential Coding for the Joint Simon Effect. Psychol Res. 2016;80(4):449-63. PubMed PMID: 25833374.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Do you really represent my task? Sequential adaptation effects to unexpected events support referential coding for the joint Simon effect. AU - Klempova,Bibiana, AU - Liepelt,Roman, Y1 - 2015/04/02/ PY - 2014/04/28/received PY - 2015/03/24/accepted PY - 2015/4/3/entrez PY - 2015/4/3/pubmed PY - 2016/12/15/medline SP - 449 EP - 63 JF - Psychological research JO - Psychol Res VL - 80 IS - 4 N2 - Recent findings suggest that a Simon effect (SE) can be induced in Individual go/nogo tasks when responding next to an event-producing object salient enough to provide a reference for the spatial coding of one's own action. However, there is skepticism against referential coding for the joint Simon effect (JSE) by proponents of task co-representation. In the present study, we tested assumptions of task co-representation and referential coding by introducing unexpected double response events in a joint go/nogo and a joint independent go/nogo task. In Experiment 1b, we tested if task representations are functionally similar in joint and standard Simon tasks. In Experiment 2, we tested sequential updating of task co-representation after unexpected single response events in the joint independent go/nogo task. Results showed increased JSEs following unexpected events in the joint go/nogo and joint independent go/nogo task (Experiment 1a). While the former finding is in line with the assumptions made by both accounts (task co-representation and referential coding), the latter finding supports referential coding. In contrast to Experiment 1a, we found a decreased SE after unexpected events in the standard Simon task (Experiment 1b), providing evidence against the functional equivalence assumption between joint and two-choice Simon tasks of the task co-representation account. Finally, we found an increased JSE also following unexpected single response events (Experiment 2), ruling out that the findings of the joint independent go/nogo task in Experiment 1a were due to a re-conceptualization of the task situation. In conclusion, our findings support referential coding also for the joint Simon effect. SN - 1430-2772 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25833374/Do_you_really_represent_my_task_Sequential_adaptation_effects_to_unexpected_events_support_referential_coding_for_the_joint_Simon_effect_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00426-015-0664-y DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -