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Mothers' child-feeding practices are associated with children's sugar-sweetened beverage intake.
J Nutr. 2015 Apr; 145(4):806-12.JN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake is a substantial source of energy in the diet of US children.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the associations between mothers' child-feeding practices and SSB intake among 6-y-old children.

METHODS

We analyzed data from the Year 6 Follow-up of the Infant Feeding Practices Study II in 1350 US children aged 6 y. The outcome variable was child's SSB intake. The exposure variables were 4 child-feeding practices of mothers: setting limits on sweets or junk foods, regulating their child's favorite food intake to prevent overconsumption, pressuring their child to eat enough, and pressuring their child to "clean the plate." We used multinomial logistic regression and controlled for child and maternal characteristics. Analyses were stratified on child weight status.

RESULTS

The consumption of SSBs ≥1 time/d was observed among 17.1% of underweight/normal-weight children and in 23.2% of overweight/obese children. Adjusted ORs (aORs) of consuming SSBs ≥1 time/d (vs. no SSB consumption) were significantly lower in children whose mothers reported setting limits on sweets/junk foods (aOR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.58 for underweight/normal-weight children; aOR: 0.16; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.79 for overweight/obese children). SSB intake was higher among underweight/normal-weight children whose mothers reported trying to keep the child from eating too much of their favorite foods (aOR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.25, 3.29). Mothers' tendency to pressure their children to consume more food or to "clean the plate" was not associated with child's SSB intake.

CONCLUSIONS

SSBs were commonly consumed by young children. The odds of daily SSB intake were lower among children whose mothers set limits on sweets/junk foods regardless of child's weight but were higher among underweight/normal-weight children whose mothers restricted the child's favorite food intake. Future studies can investigate the impact of alternatives to restrictive feeding practices that could reduce children's SSB intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, GA; and spark3@cdc.gov.Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, CDC, Atlanta, GA; and.Department of Foods and Nutrition, University of Georgia, Athens, GA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25833783

Citation

Park, Sohyun, et al. "Mothers' Child-feeding Practices Are Associated With Children's Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 4, 2015, pp. 806-12.
Park S, Li R, Birch L. Mothers' child-feeding practices are associated with children's sugar-sweetened beverage intake. J Nutr. 2015;145(4):806-12.
Park, S., Li, R., & Birch, L. (2015). Mothers' child-feeding practices are associated with children's sugar-sweetened beverage intake. The Journal of Nutrition, 145(4), 806-12. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.207233
Park S, Li R, Birch L. Mothers' Child-feeding Practices Are Associated With Children's Sugar-sweetened Beverage Intake. J Nutr. 2015;145(4):806-12. PubMed PMID: 25833783.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Mothers' child-feeding practices are associated with children's sugar-sweetened beverage intake. AU - Park,Sohyun, AU - Li,Ruowei, AU - Birch,Leann, Y1 - 2015/02/18/ PY - 2014/11/18/received PY - 2015/02/04/accepted PY - 2015/4/3/entrez PY - 2015/4/4/pubmed PY - 2015/6/9/medline KW - Infant Feeding Practice Study KW - child-feeding practices KW - children KW - obesity KW - sugar-sweetened beverage KW - sweet foods SP - 806 EP - 12 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J Nutr VL - 145 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) intake is a substantial source of energy in the diet of US children. OBJECTIVE: We examined the associations between mothers' child-feeding practices and SSB intake among 6-y-old children. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Year 6 Follow-up of the Infant Feeding Practices Study II in 1350 US children aged 6 y. The outcome variable was child's SSB intake. The exposure variables were 4 child-feeding practices of mothers: setting limits on sweets or junk foods, regulating their child's favorite food intake to prevent overconsumption, pressuring their child to eat enough, and pressuring their child to "clean the plate." We used multinomial logistic regression and controlled for child and maternal characteristics. Analyses were stratified on child weight status. RESULTS: The consumption of SSBs ≥1 time/d was observed among 17.1% of underweight/normal-weight children and in 23.2% of overweight/obese children. Adjusted ORs (aORs) of consuming SSBs ≥1 time/d (vs. no SSB consumption) were significantly lower in children whose mothers reported setting limits on sweets/junk foods (aOR: 0.29; 95% CI: 0.15, 0.58 for underweight/normal-weight children; aOR: 0.16; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.79 for overweight/obese children). SSB intake was higher among underweight/normal-weight children whose mothers reported trying to keep the child from eating too much of their favorite foods (aOR: 2.03; 95% CI: 1.25, 3.29). Mothers' tendency to pressure their children to consume more food or to "clean the plate" was not associated with child's SSB intake. CONCLUSIONS: SSBs were commonly consumed by young children. The odds of daily SSB intake were lower among children whose mothers set limits on sweets/junk foods regardless of child's weight but were higher among underweight/normal-weight children whose mothers restricted the child's favorite food intake. Future studies can investigate the impact of alternatives to restrictive feeding practices that could reduce children's SSB intake. SN - 1541-6100 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25833783/Mothers'_child_feeding_practices_are_associated_with_children's_sugar_sweetened_beverage_intake_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -