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Parental perception of child weight in the first two years-of-life: a potential link between infant feeding and preschoolers' diet.
Appetite 2015; 91:90-100A

Abstract

Approximately 23% of preschoolers are overweight or obese. Establishing a healthy dietary lifestyle at an early age can improve later child diet and body weight. This study examined the determinants of past infant feeding practices that do not follow standard feeding recommendations (breastfeeding for less than 6 months duration, cow's milk prior to the first year of age and solid foods at or before 4 months of age). It also examined the role of parental perception of child weight in the first 2 years-of-life on past infant feeding practices as well as current child diet and body weight. Families of 497 preschoolers aged 22-63 months (39.0 ± 8.2) were recruited from 30 child care centers in East-Central Illinois. Main findings indicate that past infant feeding practices were common and varied by socio-demographic factors including race/ethnicity, parental education and child gender. Children perceived as overweight in the first 2 years-of-life tended to breastfeed for lesser duration. Additionally, the majority (79.8%) of preschoolers who were classified as overweight using BMI percentile were perceived as non-overweight by the parent in the first 2 years-of-life. Mean daily total fatty/sugary food intake was higher among those perceived to be non-overweight in the first 2 years-of-life. These findings have identified parental perception of child weight in the first 2 years-of-life as a modifiable risk factor for unhealthy child diet and obesity among preschoolers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Family Resiliency Center, Department of Human and Community Development, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 904 W. Nevada, MC-081, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. Electronic address: smusaad@illinois.edu.Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.Family Resiliency Center, Department of Human and Community Development, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 904 W. Nevada, MC-081, Urbana, IL 61801, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Observational Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25843938

Citation

Musaad, Salma M A., et al. "Parental Perception of Child Weight in the First Two Years-of-life: a Potential Link Between Infant Feeding and Preschoolers' Diet." Appetite, vol. 91, 2015, pp. 90-100.
Musaad SM, Donovan SM, Fiese BH, et al. Parental perception of child weight in the first two years-of-life: a potential link between infant feeding and preschoolers' diet. Appetite. 2015;91:90-100.
Musaad, S. M., Donovan, S. M., & Fiese, B. H. (2015). Parental perception of child weight in the first two years-of-life: a potential link between infant feeding and preschoolers' diet. Appetite, 91, pp. 90-100. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2015.03.029.
Musaad SM, et al. Parental Perception of Child Weight in the First Two Years-of-life: a Potential Link Between Infant Feeding and Preschoolers' Diet. Appetite. 2015;91:90-100. PubMed PMID: 25843938.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental perception of child weight in the first two years-of-life: a potential link between infant feeding and preschoolers' diet. AU - Musaad,Salma M A, AU - Donovan,Sharon M, AU - Fiese,Barbara H, AU - ,, Y1 - 2015/04/02/ PY - 2014/08/26/received PY - 2015/03/25/revised PY - 2015/03/27/accepted PY - 2015/4/7/entrez PY - 2015/4/7/pubmed PY - 2016/3/5/medline KW - Breastfeeding KW - Obesity KW - Parental perception KW - Pediatric nutrition SP - 90 EP - 100 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 91 N2 - Approximately 23% of preschoolers are overweight or obese. Establishing a healthy dietary lifestyle at an early age can improve later child diet and body weight. This study examined the determinants of past infant feeding practices that do not follow standard feeding recommendations (breastfeeding for less than 6 months duration, cow's milk prior to the first year of age and solid foods at or before 4 months of age). It also examined the role of parental perception of child weight in the first 2 years-of-life on past infant feeding practices as well as current child diet and body weight. Families of 497 preschoolers aged 22-63 months (39.0 ± 8.2) were recruited from 30 child care centers in East-Central Illinois. Main findings indicate that past infant feeding practices were common and varied by socio-demographic factors including race/ethnicity, parental education and child gender. Children perceived as overweight in the first 2 years-of-life tended to breastfeed for lesser duration. Additionally, the majority (79.8%) of preschoolers who were classified as overweight using BMI percentile were perceived as non-overweight by the parent in the first 2 years-of-life. Mean daily total fatty/sugary food intake was higher among those perceived to be non-overweight in the first 2 years-of-life. These findings have identified parental perception of child weight in the first 2 years-of-life as a modifiable risk factor for unhealthy child diet and obesity among preschoolers. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25843938/Parental_perception_of_child_weight_in_the_first_two_years_of_life:_a_potential_link_between_infant_feeding_and_preschoolers'_diet_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(15)00131-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -