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Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).
PLoS One. 2015; 10(4):e0119454.Plos

Abstract

Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), arachidic acid (C20:0), gadoleic acid (C20:1), behenic acid (C22:0), and lignoceric acid (C24:0) are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations namely S-population (high oleic line 'SunOleic 97R' × low oleic line 'NC94022') and T-population (normal oleic line 'Tifrunner' × low oleic line 'GT-C20') were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs) and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs) QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE). Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE) mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Plant Genetics Resources Conservation Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Griffin, Georgia, United States of America.Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Hyderabad, Telangana, India; Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America.Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Hyderabad, Telangana, India; Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America.Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou, Fujian, China.Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; College of Life Science, Qingdao Agricultural University, Qingdao, Shandong, China.Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; College of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Qiongzhou University, Sanya, Hainan, China.Plant Genetics Resources Conservation Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Griffin, Georgia, United States of America.Plant Genetics Resources Conservation Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Griffin, Georgia, United States of America.Plant Genetics Resources Conservation Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Griffin, Georgia, United States of America.Crop Genetics and Breeding Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America.Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America.International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Hyderabad, Telangana, India.Crop Protection and Management Research Unit, US Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America; Department of Plant Pathology, University of Georgia, Tifton, Georgia, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25849082

Citation

Wang, Ming Li, et al. "Genetic Mapping of QTLs Controlling Fatty Acids Provided Insights Into the Genetic Control of Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea L.)." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 4, 2015, pp. e0119454.
Wang ML, Khera P, Pandey MK, et al. Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0119454.
Wang, M. L., Khera, P., Pandey, M. K., Wang, H., Qiao, L., Feng, S., Tonnis, B., Barkley, N. A., Pinnow, D., Holbrook, C. C., Culbreath, A. K., Varshney, R. K., & Guo, B. (2015). Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). PloS One, 10(4), e0119454. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0119454
Wang ML, et al. Genetic Mapping of QTLs Controlling Fatty Acids Provided Insights Into the Genetic Control of Fatty Acid Synthesis Pathway in Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea L.). PLoS One. 2015;10(4):e0119454. PubMed PMID: 25849082.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genetic mapping of QTLs controlling fatty acids provided insights into the genetic control of fatty acid synthesis pathway in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). AU - Wang,Ming Li, AU - Khera,Pawan, AU - Pandey,Manish K, AU - Wang,Hui, AU - Qiao,Lixian, AU - Feng,Suping, AU - Tonnis,Brandon, AU - Barkley,Noelle A, AU - Pinnow,David, AU - Holbrook,Corley C, AU - Culbreath,Albert K, AU - Varshney,Rajeev K, AU - Guo,Baozhu, Y1 - 2015/04/07/ PY - 2014/08/27/received PY - 2015/01/19/accepted PY - 2015/4/8/entrez PY - 2015/4/8/pubmed PY - 2016/4/14/medline SP - e0119454 EP - e0119454 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - Peanut, a high-oil crop with about 50% oil content, is either crushed for oil or used as edible products. Fatty acid composition determines the oil quality which has high relevance to consumer health, flavor, and shelf life of commercial products. In addition to the major fatty acids, oleic acid (C18:1) and linoleic acid (C18:2) accounting for about 80% of peanut oil, the six other fatty acids namely palmitic acid (C16:0), stearic acid (C18:0), arachidic acid (C20:0), gadoleic acid (C20:1), behenic acid (C22:0), and lignoceric acid (C24:0) are accounted for the rest 20%. To determine the genetic basis and to improve further understanding on effect of FAD2 genes on these fatty acids, two recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations namely S-population (high oleic line 'SunOleic 97R' × low oleic line 'NC94022') and T-population (normal oleic line 'Tifrunner' × low oleic line 'GT-C20') were developed. Genetic maps with 206 and 378 marker loci for the S- and the T-population, respectively were used for quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. As a result, a total of 164 main-effect (M-QTLs) and 27 epistatic (E-QTLs) QTLs associated with the minor fatty acids were identified with 0.16% to 40.56% phenotypic variation explained (PVE). Thirty four major QTLs (>10% of PVE) mapped on five linkage groups and 28 clusters containing more than three QTLs were also identified. These results suggest that the major QTLs with large additive effects would play an important role in controlling composition of these minor fatty acids in addition to the oleic and linoleic acids in peanut oil. The interrelationship among these fatty acids should be considered while breeding for improved peanut genotypes with good oil quality and desired fatty acid composition. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25849082/Genetic_mapping_of_QTLs_controlling_fatty_acids_provided_insights_into_the_genetic_control_of_fatty_acid_synthesis_pathway_in_peanut__Arachis_hypogaea_L___ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -