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Effects of Low- vs. High-Load Resistance Training on Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Well-Trained Men.
J Strength Cond Res. 2015 Oct; 29(10):2954-63.JS

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of low- versus high-load resistance training (RT) on muscular adaptations in well-trained subjects. Eighteen young men experienced in RT were matched according to baseline strength and then randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups: a low-load RT routine (LL) where 25-35 repetitions were performed per set per exercise (n = 9) or a high-load RT routine (HL) where 8-12 repetitions were performed per set per exercise (n = 9). During each session, subjects in both groups performed 3 sets of 7 different exercises representing all major muscles. Training was performed 3 times per week on nonconsecutive days, for a total of 8 weeks. Both HL and LL conditions produced significant increases in thickness of the elbow flexors (5.3 vs. 8.6%, respectively), elbow extensors (6.0 vs. 5.2%, respectively), and quadriceps femoris (9.3 vs. 9.5%, respectively), with no significant differences noted between groups. Improvements in back squat strength were significantly greater for HL compared with LL (19.6 vs. 8.8%, respectively), and there was a trend for greater increases in 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press (6.5 vs. 2.0%, respectively). Upper body muscle endurance (assessed by the bench press at 50% 1RM to failure) improved to a greater extent in LL compared with HL (16.6 vs. -1.2%, respectively). These findings indicate that both HL and LL training to failure can elicit significant increases in muscle hypertrophy among well-trained young men; however, HL training is superior for maximizing strength adaptations.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Health Sciences, CUNY Lehman College, Bronx, New York; 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; 3Neuromuscular and Neurometabolic Unit, McMaster University Medical Center, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada; and 4Sport Performance Research Institute New Zealand, AUT University, Auckland, New Zealand.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25853914

Citation

Schoenfeld, Brad J., et al. "Effects of Low- Vs. High-Load Resistance Training On Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Well-Trained Men." Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, vol. 29, no. 10, 2015, pp. 2954-63.
Schoenfeld BJ, Peterson MD, Ogborn D, et al. Effects of Low- vs. High-Load Resistance Training on Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Well-Trained Men. J Strength Cond Res. 2015;29(10):2954-63.
Schoenfeld, B. J., Peterson, M. D., Ogborn, D., Contreras, B., & Sonmez, G. T. (2015). Effects of Low- vs. High-Load Resistance Training on Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Well-Trained Men. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 29(10), 2954-63. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000958
Schoenfeld BJ, et al. Effects of Low- Vs. High-Load Resistance Training On Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Well-Trained Men. J Strength Cond Res. 2015;29(10):2954-63. PubMed PMID: 25853914.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of Low- vs. High-Load Resistance Training on Muscle Strength and Hypertrophy in Well-Trained Men. AU - Schoenfeld,Brad J, AU - Peterson,Mark D, AU - Ogborn,Dan, AU - Contreras,Bret, AU - Sonmez,Gul T, PY - 2015/4/9/entrez PY - 2015/4/9/pubmed PY - 2016/6/18/medline SP - 2954 EP - 63 JF - Journal of strength and conditioning research JO - J Strength Cond Res VL - 29 IS - 10 N2 - The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of low- versus high-load resistance training (RT) on muscular adaptations in well-trained subjects. Eighteen young men experienced in RT were matched according to baseline strength and then randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups: a low-load RT routine (LL) where 25-35 repetitions were performed per set per exercise (n = 9) or a high-load RT routine (HL) where 8-12 repetitions were performed per set per exercise (n = 9). During each session, subjects in both groups performed 3 sets of 7 different exercises representing all major muscles. Training was performed 3 times per week on nonconsecutive days, for a total of 8 weeks. Both HL and LL conditions produced significant increases in thickness of the elbow flexors (5.3 vs. 8.6%, respectively), elbow extensors (6.0 vs. 5.2%, respectively), and quadriceps femoris (9.3 vs. 9.5%, respectively), with no significant differences noted between groups. Improvements in back squat strength were significantly greater for HL compared with LL (19.6 vs. 8.8%, respectively), and there was a trend for greater increases in 1 repetition maximum (1RM) bench press (6.5 vs. 2.0%, respectively). Upper body muscle endurance (assessed by the bench press at 50% 1RM to failure) improved to a greater extent in LL compared with HL (16.6 vs. -1.2%, respectively). These findings indicate that both HL and LL training to failure can elicit significant increases in muscle hypertrophy among well-trained young men; however, HL training is superior for maximizing strength adaptations. SN - 1533-4287 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25853914/Effects_of_Low__vs__High_Load_Resistance_Training_on_Muscle_Strength_and_Hypertrophy_in_Well_Trained_Men_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0000000000000958 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -