Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Association of stillbirth with ambient air pollution in a California cohort study.
Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun 01; 181(11):874-82.AJ

Abstract

Recent studies have suggested an association between air pollution and stillbirth. In this California study, we examined the records of 13,999 stillbirths and 3,012,270 livebirths occurring between 1999 and 2009. Using a retrospective cohort design and logistic regression models, we calculated the odds of stillbirth associated with each pollutant exposure by trimester and throughout the entire pregnancy. Covariates considered in the model included infant sex, maternal demographic characteristics, season of last menstrual period, apparent temperature, air basin of mother's residence, and year of conception. In single-pollutant models, we found that a 10-µg/m(3) increase in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (odds ratio (OR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99, 1.13) and a 10-ppb increase in nitrogen dioxide (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.13) during the entire pregnancy were associated with stillbirth. A 10-ppb increase in ozone exposure during the third trimester was also associated with a slightly elevated risk (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.05). These ozone and nitrogen dioxide findings were fairly stable after adjustment in 2-pollutant models. However, adjustment for nitrogen dioxide attenuated the full-pregnancy-particulate matter relationship. No significant associations were found for sulfur dioxide or carbon monoxide. These findings support growing evidence of an association between air pollution and adverse birth outcomes.

Authors

No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25861815

Citation

Green, Rochelle, et al. "Association of Stillbirth With Ambient Air Pollution in a California Cohort Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 181, no. 11, 2015, pp. 874-82.
Green R, Sarovar V, Malig B, et al. Association of stillbirth with ambient air pollution in a California cohort study. Am J Epidemiol. 2015;181(11):874-82.
Green, R., Sarovar, V., Malig, B., & Basu, R. (2015). Association of stillbirth with ambient air pollution in a California cohort study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 181(11), 874-82. https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kwu460
Green R, et al. Association of Stillbirth With Ambient Air Pollution in a California Cohort Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2015 Jun 1;181(11):874-82. PubMed PMID: 25861815.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of stillbirth with ambient air pollution in a California cohort study. AU - Green,Rochelle, AU - Sarovar,Varada, AU - Malig,Brian, AU - Basu,Rupa, Y1 - 2015/04/09/ PY - 2014/06/11/received PY - 2014/12/15/accepted PY - 2015/4/12/entrez PY - 2015/4/12/pubmed PY - 2015/8/12/medline KW - California KW - air pollutants KW - fetal death KW - nitrogen dioxide KW - ozone KW - particulate matter KW - stillbirth SP - 874 EP - 82 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 181 IS - 11 N2 - Recent studies have suggested an association between air pollution and stillbirth. In this California study, we examined the records of 13,999 stillbirths and 3,012,270 livebirths occurring between 1999 and 2009. Using a retrospective cohort design and logistic regression models, we calculated the odds of stillbirth associated with each pollutant exposure by trimester and throughout the entire pregnancy. Covariates considered in the model included infant sex, maternal demographic characteristics, season of last menstrual period, apparent temperature, air basin of mother's residence, and year of conception. In single-pollutant models, we found that a 10-µg/m(3) increase in particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 2.5 µm (odds ratio (OR) = 1.06, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.99, 1.13) and a 10-ppb increase in nitrogen dioxide (OR = 1.08, 95% CI: 1.03, 1.13) during the entire pregnancy were associated with stillbirth. A 10-ppb increase in ozone exposure during the third trimester was also associated with a slightly elevated risk (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.05). These ozone and nitrogen dioxide findings were fairly stable after adjustment in 2-pollutant models. However, adjustment for nitrogen dioxide attenuated the full-pregnancy-particulate matter relationship. No significant associations were found for sulfur dioxide or carbon monoxide. These findings support growing evidence of an association between air pollution and adverse birth outcomes. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25861815/Association_of_stillbirth_with_ambient_air_pollution_in_a_California_cohort_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwu460 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -