Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Parental control over feeding in infancy. Influence of infant weight, appetite and feeding method.
Appetite 2015; 91:101-6A

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE

Parental control over feeding has been linked to child overweight. Parental control behaviours have been assumed to be exogenous to the child, but emerging evidence suggests they are also child-responsive. This study tests the hypothesis that parental control in early infancy is responsive to infant appetite and weight.

SUBJECTS AND METHODS

Participants were 1920 mothers from the Gemini twin cohort, using one randomly selected child per family. Data come from questionnaires completed when the children were approximately 8 months. Mothers completed measures of 'pressure' and 'restriction', reported feeding method (breast- and bottle feeding), rated their infant's appetite during the first 3 months, provided health professional recorded weight measurements, and reported their concerns about their infant's weight. Logistic regression examined predictors of 'pressure' and 'restriction', adjusting for maternal demographics and BMI. Interactions between feeding method and control were also tested.

RESULTS

'Pressure' was associated with lower birth weight (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.65-0.97), greater concern about underweight (OR = 1.88, 1.29-2.75), and lower infant appetite (OR = 0.59, 0.47-0.75). 'Restriction' was associated with higher appetite (OR = 1.44, 1.09-1.89) and bottle feeding (OR = 2.86, 2.18-3.75). A significant interaction with feeding method indicated that infants with high appetites were more likely to be restricted only if they were bottle-fed (OR = 1.52, 1.13-2.04).

CONCLUSION

Mothers vary in their levels of control over milk-feeding and this is partly responsive to the infant's characteristics. They tend to pressure infants who are lighter and have a smaller appetite, and restrict infants with larger appetites if they are bottle-fed. Guidance on infant feeding may be better received if it acknowledges that parents respond to infant characteristics in order to achieve their feeding goals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK; Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King's College London, Capital House, 42 Weston Street, London SE1 3QD, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK; Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King's College London, Capital House, 42 Weston Street, London SE1 3QD, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK. Electronic address: j.wardle@ucl.ac.uk.Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Health Behaviour Research Centre, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25862983

Citation

Fildes, Alison, et al. "Parental Control Over Feeding in Infancy. Influence of Infant Weight, Appetite and Feeding Method." Appetite, vol. 91, 2015, pp. 101-6.
Fildes A, van Jaarsveld CH, Llewellyn C, et al. Parental control over feeding in infancy. Influence of infant weight, appetite and feeding method. Appetite. 2015;91:101-6.
Fildes, A., van Jaarsveld, C. H., Llewellyn, C., Wardle, J., & Fisher, A. (2015). Parental control over feeding in infancy. Influence of infant weight, appetite and feeding method. Appetite, 91, pp. 101-6. doi:10.1016/j.appet.2015.04.004.
Fildes A, et al. Parental Control Over Feeding in Infancy. Influence of Infant Weight, Appetite and Feeding Method. Appetite. 2015;91:101-6. PubMed PMID: 25862983.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental control over feeding in infancy. Influence of infant weight, appetite and feeding method. AU - Fildes,Alison, AU - van Jaarsveld,Cornelia H M, AU - Llewellyn,Clare, AU - Wardle,Jane, AU - Fisher,Abigail, Y1 - 2015/04/08/ PY - 2014/11/21/received PY - 2015/03/17/revised PY - 2015/04/01/accepted PY - 2015/4/12/entrez PY - 2015/4/12/pubmed PY - 2016/3/5/medline KW - Feeding KW - Infants KW - Parental control KW - Pressure KW - Restriction KW - Weight SP - 101 EP - 6 JF - Appetite JO - Appetite VL - 91 N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Parental control over feeding has been linked to child overweight. Parental control behaviours have been assumed to be exogenous to the child, but emerging evidence suggests they are also child-responsive. This study tests the hypothesis that parental control in early infancy is responsive to infant appetite and weight. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Participants were 1920 mothers from the Gemini twin cohort, using one randomly selected child per family. Data come from questionnaires completed when the children were approximately 8 months. Mothers completed measures of 'pressure' and 'restriction', reported feeding method (breast- and bottle feeding), rated their infant's appetite during the first 3 months, provided health professional recorded weight measurements, and reported their concerns about their infant's weight. Logistic regression examined predictors of 'pressure' and 'restriction', adjusting for maternal demographics and BMI. Interactions between feeding method and control were also tested. RESULTS: 'Pressure' was associated with lower birth weight (OR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.65-0.97), greater concern about underweight (OR = 1.88, 1.29-2.75), and lower infant appetite (OR = 0.59, 0.47-0.75). 'Restriction' was associated with higher appetite (OR = 1.44, 1.09-1.89) and bottle feeding (OR = 2.86, 2.18-3.75). A significant interaction with feeding method indicated that infants with high appetites were more likely to be restricted only if they were bottle-fed (OR = 1.52, 1.13-2.04). CONCLUSION: Mothers vary in their levels of control over milk-feeding and this is partly responsive to the infant's characteristics. They tend to pressure infants who are lighter and have a smaller appetite, and restrict infants with larger appetites if they are bottle-fed. Guidance on infant feeding may be better received if it acknowledges that parents respond to infant characteristics in order to achieve their feeding goals. SN - 1095-8304 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25862983/Parental_control_over_feeding_in_infancy__Influence_of_infant_weight_appetite_and_feeding_method_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0195-6663(15)00143-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -