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Association between change in body weight after midlife and risk of hip fracture-the Singapore Chinese Health Study.
Osteoporos Int 2015; 26(7):1939-47OI

Abstract

The relationship between change in body weight and risk of fractures is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. In this cohort of middle-aged to elderly Chinese in Singapore, compared to stable weight, weight loss ≥10 % over an average of 6 years is associated with nearly 40 % increase in risk of hip fracture.

INTRODUCTION

Findings on the relationship between change in body weight and risk of hip fracture are inconsistent. In this study, we examined this association among middle-aged and elderly Chinese in Singapore.

METHODS

We used prospective data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women aged 45-74 years at recruitment in 1993-1998. Body weight and height were self-reported at recruitment and reassessed during follow-up interview in 1999-2004. Percent in weight change was computed based on the weight difference over an average of 6 years, and categorized as loss ≥10 %, loss 5 to <10 %, loss or gain <5 % (stable weight), gain 5 to <10 %, and gain ≥10 %. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied with adjustment for risk factors for hip fracture and body mass index (BMI) reported at follow-up interview.

RESULTS

About 12 % experienced weight loss ≥10 %, and another 12 % had weight gain ≥10 %. After a mean follow-up of 9.0 years, we identified 775 incident hip fractures among 42,149 eligible participants. Compared to stable weight, weight loss ≥10 % was associated with 39 % increased risk (hazard ratio 1.39; 95 % confidence interval 1.14, 1.69). Such elevated risk with weight loss ≥10 % was observed in both genders and age groups at follow-up (≤65 and >65 years) and in those with baseline BMI ≥20 kg/m(2).There was no significant association with weight gain.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings provide evidence that substantial weight loss is an important risk factor for osteoporotic hip fractures among the middle-aged to elderly Chinese.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Saw Swee Hock School of Public Health, National University of Singapore and National University Health System, Block MD1, 12 Science Drive 2, Singapore, 117549, Singapore, zhaoli_dai@nus.edu.sg.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25868509

Citation

Dai, Z, et al. "Association Between Change in Body Weight After Midlife and Risk of Hip Fracture-the Singapore Chinese Health Study." Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, vol. 26, no. 7, 2015, pp. 1939-47.
Dai Z, Ang LW, Yuan JM, et al. Association between change in body weight after midlife and risk of hip fracture-the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Osteoporos Int. 2015;26(7):1939-47.
Dai, Z., Ang, L. W., Yuan, J. M., & Koh, W. P. (2015). Association between change in body weight after midlife and risk of hip fracture-the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Osteoporosis International : a Journal Established as Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA, 26(7), pp. 1939-47. doi:10.1007/s00198-015-3099-9.
Dai Z, et al. Association Between Change in Body Weight After Midlife and Risk of Hip Fracture-the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Osteoporos Int. 2015;26(7):1939-47. PubMed PMID: 25868509.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between change in body weight after midlife and risk of hip fracture-the Singapore Chinese Health Study. AU - Dai,Z, AU - Ang,L-W, AU - Yuan,J-M, AU - Koh,W-P, Y1 - 2015/04/14/ PY - 2014/11/26/received PY - 2015/03/03/accepted PY - 2015/4/15/entrez PY - 2015/4/15/pubmed PY - 2016/4/29/medline SP - 1939 EP - 47 JF - Osteoporosis international : a journal established as result of cooperation between the European Foundation for Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of the USA JO - Osteoporos Int VL - 26 IS - 7 N2 - UNLABELLED: The relationship between change in body weight and risk of fractures is inconsistent in epidemiologic studies. In this cohort of middle-aged to elderly Chinese in Singapore, compared to stable weight, weight loss ≥10 % over an average of 6 years is associated with nearly 40 % increase in risk of hip fracture. INTRODUCTION: Findings on the relationship between change in body weight and risk of hip fracture are inconsistent. In this study, we examined this association among middle-aged and elderly Chinese in Singapore. METHODS: We used prospective data from the Singapore Chinese Health Study, a population-based cohort of 63,257 Chinese men and women aged 45-74 years at recruitment in 1993-1998. Body weight and height were self-reported at recruitment and reassessed during follow-up interview in 1999-2004. Percent in weight change was computed based on the weight difference over an average of 6 years, and categorized as loss ≥10 %, loss 5 to <10 %, loss or gain <5 % (stable weight), gain 5 to <10 %, and gain ≥10 %. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was applied with adjustment for risk factors for hip fracture and body mass index (BMI) reported at follow-up interview. RESULTS: About 12 % experienced weight loss ≥10 %, and another 12 % had weight gain ≥10 %. After a mean follow-up of 9.0 years, we identified 775 incident hip fractures among 42,149 eligible participants. Compared to stable weight, weight loss ≥10 % was associated with 39 % increased risk (hazard ratio 1.39; 95 % confidence interval 1.14, 1.69). Such elevated risk with weight loss ≥10 % was observed in both genders and age groups at follow-up (≤65 and >65 years) and in those with baseline BMI ≥20 kg/m(2).There was no significant association with weight gain. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide evidence that substantial weight loss is an important risk factor for osteoporotic hip fractures among the middle-aged to elderly Chinese. SN - 1433-2965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25868509/Association_between_change_in_body_weight_after_midlife_and_risk_of_hip_fracture_the_Singapore_Chinese_Health_Study_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00198-015-3099-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -