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Threatened Caribbean coral is able to mitigate the adverse effects of ocean acidification on calcification by increasing feeding rate.
PLoS One. 2015; 10(4):e0123394.Plos

Abstract

Global climate change threatens coral growth and reef ecosystem health via ocean warming and ocean acidification (OA). Whereas the negative impacts of these stressors are increasingly well-documented, studies identifying pathways to resilience are still poorly understood. Heterotrophy has been shown to help corals experiencing decreases in growth due to either thermal or OA stress; however, the mechanism by which it mitigates these decreases remains unclear. This study tested the ability of coral heterotrophy to mitigate reductions in growth due to climate change stress in the critically endangered Caribbean coral Acropora cervicornis via changes in feeding rate and lipid content. Corals were either fed or unfed and exposed to elevated temperature (30°C), enriched pCO2 (800 ppm), or both (30°C/800 ppm) as compared to a control (26°C/390 ppm) for 8 weeks. Feeding rate and lipid content both increased in corals experiencing OA vs. present-day conditions, and were significantly correlated. Fed corals were able to maintain ambient growth rates at both elevated temperature and elevated CO2, while unfed corals experienced significant decreases in growth with respect to fed conspecifics. Our results show for the first time that a threatened coral species can buffer OA-reduced calcification by increasing feeding rates and lipid content.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, 33149, United States of America.Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, 33149, United States of America; Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratories (AOML), National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Miami, Florida, 33149, United States of America.Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, 33149, United States of America.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25874963

Citation

Towle, Erica K., et al. "Threatened Caribbean Coral Is Able to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Ocean Acidification On Calcification By Increasing Feeding Rate." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 4, 2015, pp. e0123394.
Towle EK, Enochs IC, Langdon C. Threatened Caribbean coral is able to mitigate the adverse effects of ocean acidification on calcification by increasing feeding rate. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(4):e0123394.
Towle, E. K., Enochs, I. C., & Langdon, C. (2015). Threatened Caribbean coral is able to mitigate the adverse effects of ocean acidification on calcification by increasing feeding rate. PloS One, 10(4), e0123394. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0123394
Towle EK, Enochs IC, Langdon C. Threatened Caribbean Coral Is Able to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Ocean Acidification On Calcification By Increasing Feeding Rate. PLoS ONE. 2015;10(4):e0123394. PubMed PMID: 25874963.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Threatened Caribbean coral is able to mitigate the adverse effects of ocean acidification on calcification by increasing feeding rate. AU - Towle,Erica K, AU - Enochs,Ian C, AU - Langdon,Chris, Y1 - 2015/04/15/ PY - 2014/09/24/received PY - 2015/02/18/accepted PY - 2015/4/16/entrez PY - 2015/4/16/pubmed PY - 2016/1/12/medline SP - e0123394 EP - e0123394 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS ONE VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - Global climate change threatens coral growth and reef ecosystem health via ocean warming and ocean acidification (OA). Whereas the negative impacts of these stressors are increasingly well-documented, studies identifying pathways to resilience are still poorly understood. Heterotrophy has been shown to help corals experiencing decreases in growth due to either thermal or OA stress; however, the mechanism by which it mitigates these decreases remains unclear. This study tested the ability of coral heterotrophy to mitigate reductions in growth due to climate change stress in the critically endangered Caribbean coral Acropora cervicornis via changes in feeding rate and lipid content. Corals were either fed or unfed and exposed to elevated temperature (30°C), enriched pCO2 (800 ppm), or both (30°C/800 ppm) as compared to a control (26°C/390 ppm) for 8 weeks. Feeding rate and lipid content both increased in corals experiencing OA vs. present-day conditions, and were significantly correlated. Fed corals were able to maintain ambient growth rates at both elevated temperature and elevated CO2, while unfed corals experienced significant decreases in growth with respect to fed conspecifics. Our results show for the first time that a threatened coral species can buffer OA-reduced calcification by increasing feeding rates and lipid content. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25874963/Threatened_Caribbean_coral_is_able_to_mitigate_the_adverse_effects_of_ocean_acidification_on_calcification_by_increasing_feeding_rate_ L2 - http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0123394 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -