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In vitro activity of surotomycin against contemporary clinical isolates of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains obtained in Spain.
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2015 Aug; 70(8):2311-5.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea in developed countries. Metronidazole and vancomycin are the mainstay of treatment, although they are associated with treatment failure and recurrence. Novel agents have emerged to address these shortcomings. We investigated the in vitro activity of a novel agent, surotomycin (formerly CB-183,315), and seven other antimicrobial agents against clinical C. difficile isolates.

METHODS

Antimicrobial susceptibility to surotomycin, fidaxomicin, metronidazole, vancomycin, clindamycin, rifaximin, moxifloxacin and tigecycline was determined for 100 contemporary clinical isolates of C. difficile collected in 2013. MICs were determined by agar dilution according to CLSI procedures. In addition, 10 strains with reduced susceptibility to metronidazole (n = 6) and vancomycin (n = 4) were also tested. Strains were PCR ribotyped.

RESULTS

The MICs of surotomycin for the 100 isolates ranged from ≤0.06 to 2 mg/L, with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.31 mg/L and an MIC50/90 of 0.25/0.5 mg/L. The MIC range of surotomycin was 0.25-1 mg/L (GM = 0.45 mg/L) for isolates with reduced metronidazole susceptibility and 0.125-0.5 mg/L (GM = 0.25 mg/L) for isolates with reduced vancomycin susceptibility. The three most common ribotypes were 001 (31.0%), 014/020 (17.0%) and 078/126 (17.0%). Ribotype 014/020 exhibited the lowest MICs of surotomycin (GM = 0.22 mg/L); the highest MICs were for ribotype 078/126 (GM = 0.72 mg/L).

CONCLUSIONS

Surotomycin exhibited potent in vitro activity against all the isolates tested, including those with elevated metronidazole and vancomycin MICs. The potential role of this agent in the treatment of CDI requires further clinical evaluation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain helenrei@hotmail.com.Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES CB06/06/0058), Madrid, Spain.Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES CB06/06/0058), Madrid, Spain.Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES CB06/06/0058), Madrid, Spain.Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain.Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES CB06/06/0058), Madrid, Spain.Department of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain Medicine Department, School of Medicine, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Madrid, Spain Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón, Madrid, Spain CIBER de Enfermedades Respiratorias (CIBERES CB06/06/0058), Madrid, Spain.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25876881

Citation

Reigadas, E, et al. "In Vitro Activity of Surotomycin Against Contemporary Clinical Isolates of Toxigenic Clostridium Difficile Strains Obtained in Spain." The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, vol. 70, no. 8, 2015, pp. 2311-5.
Reigadas E, Alcalá L, Marín M, et al. In vitro activity of surotomycin against contemporary clinical isolates of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains obtained in Spain. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2015;70(8):2311-5.
Reigadas, E., Alcalá, L., Marín, M., Pelaéz, T., Martin, A., Iglesias, C., & Bouza, E. (2015). In vitro activity of surotomycin against contemporary clinical isolates of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains obtained in Spain. The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, 70(8), 2311-5. https://doi.org/10.1093/jac/dkv092
Reigadas E, et al. In Vitro Activity of Surotomycin Against Contemporary Clinical Isolates of Toxigenic Clostridium Difficile Strains Obtained in Spain. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2015;70(8):2311-5. PubMed PMID: 25876881.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro activity of surotomycin against contemporary clinical isolates of toxigenic Clostridium difficile strains obtained in Spain. AU - Reigadas,E, AU - Alcalá,L, AU - Marín,M, AU - Pelaéz,T, AU - Martin,A, AU - Iglesias,C, AU - Bouza,E, Y1 - 2015/04/15/ PY - 2014/11/17/received PY - 2015/03/18/accepted PY - 2015/4/17/entrez PY - 2015/4/17/pubmed PY - 2016/4/15/medline KW - C. difficile KW - antimicrobial susceptibility KW - fidaxomicin KW - ribotype SP - 2311 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy JO - J. Antimicrob. Chemother. VL - 70 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is the leading cause of hospital-acquired diarrhoea in developed countries. Metronidazole and vancomycin are the mainstay of treatment, although they are associated with treatment failure and recurrence. Novel agents have emerged to address these shortcomings. We investigated the in vitro activity of a novel agent, surotomycin (formerly CB-183,315), and seven other antimicrobial agents against clinical C. difficile isolates. METHODS: Antimicrobial susceptibility to surotomycin, fidaxomicin, metronidazole, vancomycin, clindamycin, rifaximin, moxifloxacin and tigecycline was determined for 100 contemporary clinical isolates of C. difficile collected in 2013. MICs were determined by agar dilution according to CLSI procedures. In addition, 10 strains with reduced susceptibility to metronidazole (n = 6) and vancomycin (n = 4) were also tested. Strains were PCR ribotyped. RESULTS: The MICs of surotomycin for the 100 isolates ranged from ≤0.06 to 2 mg/L, with a geometric mean (GM) of 0.31 mg/L and an MIC50/90 of 0.25/0.5 mg/L. The MIC range of surotomycin was 0.25-1 mg/L (GM = 0.45 mg/L) for isolates with reduced metronidazole susceptibility and 0.125-0.5 mg/L (GM = 0.25 mg/L) for isolates with reduced vancomycin susceptibility. The three most common ribotypes were 001 (31.0%), 014/020 (17.0%) and 078/126 (17.0%). Ribotype 014/020 exhibited the lowest MICs of surotomycin (GM = 0.22 mg/L); the highest MICs were for ribotype 078/126 (GM = 0.72 mg/L). CONCLUSIONS: Surotomycin exhibited potent in vitro activity against all the isolates tested, including those with elevated metronidazole and vancomycin MICs. The potential role of this agent in the treatment of CDI requires further clinical evaluation. SN - 1460-2091 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25876881/In_vitro_activity_of_surotomycin_against_contemporary_clinical_isolates_of_toxigenic_Clostridium_difficile_strains_obtained_in_Spain_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jac/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jac/dkv092 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -