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Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats.
Nutr Cancer 2015; 67(5):713-20NC

Abstract

Malignancies induce disposal of arginine, an important substrate for the immune system. To sustain immune function, the tumor-bearing host accelerates arginine's intestinal-renal axis by glutamine mobilization from skeletal muscle and this may promote cachexia. Glutamine supplementation stimulates argi-nine production in healthy subjects. Arginine's intestinal-renal axis and the effect of glutamine supplementation in cancer cach-exia have not been investigated. This study evaluated the long-term adaptations of the interorgan pathway for arginine production following the onset of cachexia and the metabolic effect of glutamine supplementation in the cachectic state. Fischer-344 rats were randomly divided into a tumor-bearing group (n = 12), control group (n = 7) and tumor-bearing group receiving a glutamine-enriched diet (n = 9). Amino acid fluxes and net fractional extractions across intestine, kidneys, and liver were studied. Compared to controls, the portal-drained viscera of tumor-bearing rats took up significantly more glutamine and released significantly less citrulline. Renal metabolism was unchanged in the cachectic tumor-bearing rats compared with controls. Glutamine supplementation had no effects on intestinal and renal adaptations. In conclusion, in the cachectic state, an increase in intestinal glutamine uptake is not accompanied by an increase in renal arginine production. The adaptations found in the cachectic, tumor-bearing rat do not depend on glutamine availability.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Surgery , VU University Medical Center , Amsterdam , The Netherlands and Department of Surgery , Medical Center Alkmaar, Trial Center Holland Health , Alkmaar , The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25879155

Citation

Buijs, Nikki, et al. "Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats." Nutrition and Cancer, vol. 67, no. 5, 2015, pp. 713-20.
Buijs N, Vermeulen MA, Weeda VB, et al. Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats. Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(5):713-20.
Buijs, N., Vermeulen, M. A., Weeda, V. B., Bading, J. R., Houdijk, A. P., & van Leeuwen, P. A. (2015). Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats. Nutrition and Cancer, 67(5), pp. 713-20. doi:10.1080/01635581.2015.1029638.
Buijs N, et al. Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats. Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(5):713-20. PubMed PMID: 25879155.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adaptations of Arginine's Intestinal-Renal Axis in Cachectic Tumor-Bearing Rats. AU - Buijs,Nikki, AU - Vermeulen,Mechteld A R, AU - Weeda,Viola B, AU - Bading,James R, AU - Houdijk,Alexander P J, AU - van Leeuwen,Paul A M, Y1 - 2015/04/16/ PY - 2015/4/17/entrez PY - 2015/4/17/pubmed PY - 2016/5/4/medline SP - 713 EP - 20 JF - Nutrition and cancer JO - Nutr Cancer VL - 67 IS - 5 N2 - Malignancies induce disposal of arginine, an important substrate for the immune system. To sustain immune function, the tumor-bearing host accelerates arginine's intestinal-renal axis by glutamine mobilization from skeletal muscle and this may promote cachexia. Glutamine supplementation stimulates argi-nine production in healthy subjects. Arginine's intestinal-renal axis and the effect of glutamine supplementation in cancer cach-exia have not been investigated. This study evaluated the long-term adaptations of the interorgan pathway for arginine production following the onset of cachexia and the metabolic effect of glutamine supplementation in the cachectic state. Fischer-344 rats were randomly divided into a tumor-bearing group (n = 12), control group (n = 7) and tumor-bearing group receiving a glutamine-enriched diet (n = 9). Amino acid fluxes and net fractional extractions across intestine, kidneys, and liver were studied. Compared to controls, the portal-drained viscera of tumor-bearing rats took up significantly more glutamine and released significantly less citrulline. Renal metabolism was unchanged in the cachectic tumor-bearing rats compared with controls. Glutamine supplementation had no effects on intestinal and renal adaptations. In conclusion, in the cachectic state, an increase in intestinal glutamine uptake is not accompanied by an increase in renal arginine production. The adaptations found in the cachectic, tumor-bearing rat do not depend on glutamine availability. SN - 1532-7914 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25879155/Adaptations_of_Arginine's_Intestinal_Renal_Axis_in_Cachectic_Tumor_Bearing_Rats_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/01635581.2015.1029638 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -