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Role of Stress and Smoking as Modifiable Risk Factors for Nonpersistent and Persistent Back Pain in Women.
Clin J Pain 2016; 32(3):232-7CJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to examine the association between smoking and stress with nonpersistent and persistent back pain.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Participants included 3703 women who took part in the Kentucky Women's Health Registry in 2008 and 2011. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to examine whether smoking status and stress levels were predictive of nonpersistent and persistent back pain, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics.

RESULTS

Stress level was associated with both nonpersistent and persistent back pain, whereas smoking was associated with only persistent back pain. Current smokers were 1.5 times more likely to report persistent back pain compared with never smokers, controlling for age, race, body mass index, educational attainment, and employment status. Women experiencing large or overwhelming amounts of stress were 1.8 times more likely to have nonpersistent back pain and 1.6 times more likely to report persistent back pain, compared with women experiencing small amounts of stress.

DISCUSSION

This study further substantiates the findings of prior research that describes a significant relationship between back pain, stress, and smoking. Understanding the role of modifiable risk factors (ie, smoking and stress) and their impact on back pain provides an opportunity to offer a comprehensive and tailored treatment plan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, KY.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25882868

Citation

Schmelzer, Amy C., et al. "Role of Stress and Smoking as Modifiable Risk Factors for Nonpersistent and Persistent Back Pain in Women." The Clinical Journal of Pain, vol. 32, no. 3, 2016, pp. 232-7.
Schmelzer AC, Salt E, Wiggins A, et al. Role of Stress and Smoking as Modifiable Risk Factors for Nonpersistent and Persistent Back Pain in Women. Clin J Pain. 2016;32(3):232-7.
Schmelzer, A. C., Salt, E., Wiggins, A., Crofford, L. J., Bush, H., & Mannino, D. M. (2016). Role of Stress and Smoking as Modifiable Risk Factors for Nonpersistent and Persistent Back Pain in Women. The Clinical Journal of Pain, 32(3), pp. 232-7. doi:10.1097/AJP.0000000000000245.
Schmelzer AC, et al. Role of Stress and Smoking as Modifiable Risk Factors for Nonpersistent and Persistent Back Pain in Women. Clin J Pain. 2016;32(3):232-7. PubMed PMID: 25882868.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Role of Stress and Smoking as Modifiable Risk Factors for Nonpersistent and Persistent Back Pain in Women. AU - Schmelzer,Amy C, AU - Salt,Elizabeth, AU - Wiggins,Amanda, AU - Crofford,Leslie J, AU - Bush,Heather, AU - Mannino,David M, PY - 2015/4/18/entrez PY - 2015/4/18/pubmed PY - 2016/11/1/medline SP - 232 EP - 7 JF - The Clinical journal of pain JO - Clin J Pain VL - 32 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to examine the association between smoking and stress with nonpersistent and persistent back pain. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Participants included 3703 women who took part in the Kentucky Women's Health Registry in 2008 and 2011. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was used to examine whether smoking status and stress levels were predictive of nonpersistent and persistent back pain, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS: Stress level was associated with both nonpersistent and persistent back pain, whereas smoking was associated with only persistent back pain. Current smokers were 1.5 times more likely to report persistent back pain compared with never smokers, controlling for age, race, body mass index, educational attainment, and employment status. Women experiencing large or overwhelming amounts of stress were 1.8 times more likely to have nonpersistent back pain and 1.6 times more likely to report persistent back pain, compared with women experiencing small amounts of stress. DISCUSSION: This study further substantiates the findings of prior research that describes a significant relationship between back pain, stress, and smoking. Understanding the role of modifiable risk factors (ie, smoking and stress) and their impact on back pain provides an opportunity to offer a comprehensive and tailored treatment plan. SN - 1536-5409 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25882868/Role_of_Stress_and_Smoking_as_Modifiable_Risk_Factors_for_Nonpersistent_and_Persistent_Back_Pain_in_Women_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=25882868 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -