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Prevalence and prognostic implications of vitamin D deficiency in chronic kidney disease.

Abstract

Vitamin D is an important nutrient involved in bone mineral metabolism, and vitamin D status is reflected by serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and nutritional vitamin D supplementation decreases elevated parathyroid hormone concentrations in subgroups of these patients. Furthermore, vitamin D is supposed to have pleiotropic effects on various diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, malignancies, infectious diseases, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Indeed, there is cumulative evidence showing the associations of low vitamin D with the development and progression of CKD, cardiovascular complication, and high mortality. Recently, genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D-binding protein have received great attention because they largely affect bioavailable 25(OH)D concentrations. This finding suggests that the serum total 25(OH)D concentrations would not be comparable among different gene polymorphisms and thus may be inappropriate as an index of vitamin D status. This finding may refute the conventional definition of vitamin D status based solely on serum total 25(OH)D concentrations.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Geriatric Medicine & Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

    ,

    Department of Comprehensive Kidney Disease Research, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

    Department of Geriatric Medicine & Nephrology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, 2-2 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

    Source

    Disease markers 2015: 2015 pg 868961

    MeSH

    Animals
    Humans
    Prevalence
    Prognosis
    Receptors, Calcitriol
    Renal Insufficiency, Chronic
    Vitamin D
    Vitamin D Deficiency

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25883412

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and prognostic implications of vitamin D deficiency in chronic kidney disease. AU - Obi,Yoshitsugu, AU - Hamano,Takayuki, AU - Isaka,Yoshitaka, Y1 - 2015/03/26/ PY - 2015/1/20/received PY - 2015/3/11/accepted PY - 2015/3/26/epublish PY - 2015/4/18/entrez PY - 2015/4/18/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline SP - 868961 EP - 868961 JF - Disease markers JO - Dis. Markers VL - 2015 N2 - Vitamin D is an important nutrient involved in bone mineral metabolism, and vitamin D status is reflected by serum total 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentrations. Vitamin D deficiency is highly prevalent in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), and nutritional vitamin D supplementation decreases elevated parathyroid hormone concentrations in subgroups of these patients. Furthermore, vitamin D is supposed to have pleiotropic effects on various diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, malignancies, infectious diseases, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. Indeed, there is cumulative evidence showing the associations of low vitamin D with the development and progression of CKD, cardiovascular complication, and high mortality. Recently, genetic polymorphisms in vitamin D-binding protein have received great attention because they largely affect bioavailable 25(OH)D concentrations. This finding suggests that the serum total 25(OH)D concentrations would not be comparable among different gene polymorphisms and thus may be inappropriate as an index of vitamin D status. This finding may refute the conventional definition of vitamin D status based solely on serum total 25(OH)D concentrations. SN - 1875-8630 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25883412/full_citation L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/868961 ER -