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Prospective study of breast cancer in relation to coffee, tea and caffeine in Sweden.
Int J Cancer 2015; 137(8):1979-89IJ

Abstract

Studies of coffee and tea consumption and caffeine intake as risk factors for breast cancer are inconclusive. We assessed coffee and tea consumption, caffeine intake, and possible confounding factors among 42,099 women from the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health study, the participants of which were aged 30-49 years at enrollment in 1991-1992. Complete follow-up for breast cancer incidence was performed through 2012 via linkage to national registries. Poisson regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer. During follow-up 1,395 breast cancers were diagnosed. The RR was 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99) for a 1-unit increase in cups of coffee/day, 1.14 (95% CI 1.05-1.24) for a 1-unit increase in cups of tea/day, and 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-1.00) for a 100 mg/day increase in caffeine intake. Although the RR for no consumption (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.69-1.08), a group with a relatively small number of women, was not statistically significant, women with higher consumption had a decreased breast cancer risk (3-4 cups/day: RR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.76-1.00; ≥5 cups/day: RR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.70-0.94) compared to women consuming 1-2 cups of coffee/day. Compared to no consumption, women consuming >1 cups tea/day showed an increased breast cancer risk (RR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.00-1.42). Similar patterns of estimates were observed for breast cancer risk overall, during pre- and postmenopausal years, and for ER+ or PR+ breast cancer, but not for ER- and PR- breast cancer. Our findings suggest that coffee consumption and caffeine intake is negatively associated with the risk of overall and ER+/PR- breast cancer, and tea consumption is positively associated with the risk of overall and ER+/PR+ breast cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Cancer Control Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, and National Cancer Control Institute, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Republic of Korea.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Department of Research, The Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway. Department of Genetic Epidemiology, Folkhälsan Research Center, Helsinki, Finland. Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, The Arctic University of Norway, Tromsø, Norway.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25885188

Citation

Oh, Jin-Kyoung, et al. "Prospective Study of Breast Cancer in Relation to Coffee, Tea and Caffeine in Sweden." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 137, no. 8, 2015, pp. 1979-89.
Oh JK, Sandin S, Ström P, et al. Prospective study of breast cancer in relation to coffee, tea and caffeine in Sweden. Int J Cancer. 2015;137(8):1979-89.
Oh, J. K., Sandin, S., Ström, P., Löf, M., Adami, H. O., & Weiderpass, E. (2015). Prospective study of breast cancer in relation to coffee, tea and caffeine in Sweden. International Journal of Cancer, 137(8), pp. 1979-89. doi:10.1002/ijc.29569.
Oh JK, et al. Prospective Study of Breast Cancer in Relation to Coffee, Tea and Caffeine in Sweden. Int J Cancer. 2015 Oct 15;137(8):1979-89. PubMed PMID: 25885188.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prospective study of breast cancer in relation to coffee, tea and caffeine in Sweden. AU - Oh,Jin-Kyoung, AU - Sandin,Sven, AU - Ström,Peter, AU - Löf,Marie, AU - Adami,Hans-Olov, AU - Weiderpass,Elisabete, Y1 - 2015/04/30/ PY - 2014/11/24/received PY - 2015/04/07/accepted PY - 2015/4/18/entrez PY - 2015/4/18/pubmed PY - 2015/12/15/medline KW - Sweden KW - breast cancer KW - caffeine KW - coffee KW - cohort KW - tea SP - 1979 EP - 89 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 137 IS - 8 N2 - Studies of coffee and tea consumption and caffeine intake as risk factors for breast cancer are inconclusive. We assessed coffee and tea consumption, caffeine intake, and possible confounding factors among 42,099 women from the Swedish Women's Lifestyle and Health study, the participants of which were aged 30-49 years at enrollment in 1991-1992. Complete follow-up for breast cancer incidence was performed through 2012 via linkage to national registries. Poisson regression models were used to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for breast cancer. During follow-up 1,395 breast cancers were diagnosed. The RR was 0.97 (95% CI 0.94-0.99) for a 1-unit increase in cups of coffee/day, 1.14 (95% CI 1.05-1.24) for a 1-unit increase in cups of tea/day, and 0.97 (95% CI 0.95-1.00) for a 100 mg/day increase in caffeine intake. Although the RR for no consumption (RR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.69-1.08), a group with a relatively small number of women, was not statistically significant, women with higher consumption had a decreased breast cancer risk (3-4 cups/day: RR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.76-1.00; ≥5 cups/day: RR = 0.81, 95% CI 0.70-0.94) compared to women consuming 1-2 cups of coffee/day. Compared to no consumption, women consuming >1 cups tea/day showed an increased breast cancer risk (RR = 1.19, 95% CI 1.00-1.42). Similar patterns of estimates were observed for breast cancer risk overall, during pre- and postmenopausal years, and for ER+ or PR+ breast cancer, but not for ER- and PR- breast cancer. Our findings suggest that coffee consumption and caffeine intake is negatively associated with the risk of overall and ER+/PR- breast cancer, and tea consumption is positively associated with the risk of overall and ER+/PR+ breast cancer. SN - 1097-0215 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25885188/Prospective_study_of_breast_cancer_in_relation_to_coffee_tea_and_caffeine_in_Sweden_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29569 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -