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Adipose-derived stem cell-based treatment for acute liver failure.
Stem Cell Res Ther 2015; 6:40SC

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Acute liver failure (ALF) is a highly lethal disease, for which effective therapeutic methods are limited. Although allogeneic liver transplantation is a viable treatment method for ALF, there is a serious shortage of liver donors. Recent studies suggest that stem cell transplantation is a more promising alternative. Hence, we investigate whether human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the therapeutic potential for ALF in this study based on the studies of rat models.

METHODS

Sprague Dawley rats were used to establish ALF models by D-galactosamine injection. These rats were randomly divided into a human ASC-treated group and a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. The human ASCs or PBS was transplanted through the spleen of rats. The indices of hepatic function and hepatic histology were dynamically detected, and the survival rates of rats were also counted. Double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry was employed to detect the ASC fate after transplantation. Moreover, both concentrated ASC conditional media and ASC lysates were transplanted through the femoral vain of rats to investigate the therapeutic potential for ALF.

RESULTS

The ASC transplantation group showed improved viability in comparison with the sham control. Histological and biochemical analysis suggested that liver morphology and function were improved in terms of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Although a plethora of ASCs persist in the spleen, the improvement in liver function was obvious. However, ASCs did not differentiate into hepatocytes after engrafting to livers within 3 days. In addition, both concentrated serum-free ASC conditional media and ASC lysates, characterized by high levels of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, demonstrated obvious improvement in terms of high survival rates of ALF rats.

CONCLUSION

Our data suggest that ASC transplantation has the potential for ALF treatment partly by the mechanism of secreting growth factors contributing to liver regeneration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 301 Yanchangzhong Road, Shanghai, 200072, P.R. China. chenguangf2006@gmail.com.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. jyp120@hotmail.com.Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 301 Yanchangzhong Road, Shanghai, 200072, P.R. China. xiujuansh@gmail.com.Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 301 Yanchangzhong Road, Shanghai, 200072, P.R. China. yuqiu2012@gmail.com.Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 301 Yanchangzhong Road, Shanghai, 200072, P.R. China. mmisyou@126.com.Department of Infectious Diseases, Affiliated Hospital, Guiyang Medical College, 9 Beijing Road, Guiyang, 550004, P.R. China. chengmL@21cn.com.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. drwxj85@yahoo.com.cn.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. ccw2@163.com.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. 316706744@qq.com.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. jiangfuzhu1979@163.com.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. 79286545@qq.com.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. 363162137@qq.com.Shanghai Liver Diseases Research Center, The Nanjing Military Command, 9585 Humin Road, Shanghai, 200235, P.R. China. qcfu85@163.com.Tenth People's Hospital, Tongji University School of Medicine, 301 Yanchangzhong Road, Shanghai, 200072, P.R. China. xqliu2014@gmail.com.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25890008

Citation

Chen, Guangfeng, et al. "Adipose-derived Stem Cell-based Treatment for Acute Liver Failure." Stem Cell Research & Therapy, vol. 6, 2015, p. 40.
Chen G, Jin Y, Shi X, et al. Adipose-derived stem cell-based treatment for acute liver failure. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2015;6:40.
Chen, G., Jin, Y., Shi, X., Qiu, Y., Zhang, Y., Cheng, M., ... Liu, X. (2015). Adipose-derived stem cell-based treatment for acute liver failure. Stem Cell Research & Therapy, 6, p. 40. doi:10.1186/s13287-015-0040-2.
Chen G, et al. Adipose-derived Stem Cell-based Treatment for Acute Liver Failure. Stem Cell Res Ther. 2015 Mar 21;6:40. PubMed PMID: 25890008.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adipose-derived stem cell-based treatment for acute liver failure. AU - Chen,Guangfeng, AU - Jin,Yinpeng, AU - Shi,Xiujuan, AU - Qiu,Yu, AU - Zhang,Yushan, AU - Cheng,Mingliang, AU - Wang,Xiaojin, AU - Chen,Chengwei, AU - Wu,Yinxia, AU - Jiang,Fuzhu, AU - Li,Li, AU - Zhou,Heng, AU - Fu,Qingchun, AU - Liu,Xiaoqing, Y1 - 2015/03/21/ PY - 2014/04/14/received PY - 2015/03/05/accepted PY - 2014/11/14/revised PY - 2015/4/19/entrez PY - 2015/4/19/pubmed PY - 2016/1/30/medline SP - 40 EP - 40 JF - Stem cell research & therapy JO - Stem Cell Res Ther VL - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Acute liver failure (ALF) is a highly lethal disease, for which effective therapeutic methods are limited. Although allogeneic liver transplantation is a viable treatment method for ALF, there is a serious shortage of liver donors. Recent studies suggest that stem cell transplantation is a more promising alternative. Hence, we investigate whether human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have the therapeutic potential for ALF in this study based on the studies of rat models. METHODS: Sprague Dawley rats were used to establish ALF models by D-galactosamine injection. These rats were randomly divided into a human ASC-treated group and a phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. The human ASCs or PBS was transplanted through the spleen of rats. The indices of hepatic function and hepatic histology were dynamically detected, and the survival rates of rats were also counted. Double-fluorescence immunohistochemistry was employed to detect the ASC fate after transplantation. Moreover, both concentrated ASC conditional media and ASC lysates were transplanted through the femoral vain of rats to investigate the therapeutic potential for ALF. RESULTS: The ASC transplantation group showed improved viability in comparison with the sham control. Histological and biochemical analysis suggested that liver morphology and function were improved in terms of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Although a plethora of ASCs persist in the spleen, the improvement in liver function was obvious. However, ASCs did not differentiate into hepatocytes after engrafting to livers within 3 days. In addition, both concentrated serum-free ASC conditional media and ASC lysates, characterized by high levels of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor, demonstrated obvious improvement in terms of high survival rates of ALF rats. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that ASC transplantation has the potential for ALF treatment partly by the mechanism of secreting growth factors contributing to liver regeneration. SN - 1757-6512 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25890008/Adipose_derived_stem_cell_based_treatment_for_acute_liver_failure_ L2 - https://stemcellres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13287-015-0040-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -