Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Farmers' market shopping and dietary behaviours among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants.
Public Health Nutr. 2015 Sep; 18(13):2407-14.PH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Because farmers' markets include a variety of fruits and vegetables, shopping at farmers' markets would likely improve diet quality among low-income consumers, as well as promote sustainable direct farm-to-consumer business models. However, not much is known about how to promote farmers' market shopping among low-income consumers. Therefore, the purpose of the present paper was to examine barriers to and facilitators of shopping at farmers' markets and associations between shopping at farmers' markets and self-reported dietary behaviours (fruit and vegetable, sugar-sweetened beverage and fast-food consumption) and BMI.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional analyses of associations between farmers' market shopping frequency, awareness of markets, access to markets, dietary behaviours and BMI.

SETTING

Department of Social Services, Pitt County, eastern North Carolina, USA.

SUBJECTS

Between April and July 2013, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants (n 205) completed a quantitative survey.

RESULTS

Barriers to shopping at farmers' markets included does not accept SNAP/electronic benefit transfer, out of the way and lack of transportation. Farmers' market shopping was associated with awareness of farmers' markets (estimate =0·18 (se 0·04), P<0·001). Fruit and vegetable consumption was positively associated with farmers' market shopping (estimate =1·06 (se 0·32), P=0·001).

CONCLUSIONS

Our study is one of the first to examine SNAP participants' farmers' market shopping, distance to farmers' markets and dietary behaviours. Barriers to shopping at farmers' markets and increasing awareness of existing markets should be addressed in future interventions to increase SNAP participants' use of farmers' markets, ultimately improving diet quality in this high-risk group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

1Department of Public Health,Brody School of Medicine,East Carolina University,600 Moye Blvd,MS 660,Lakeside Annex 7,Greenville,NC 27834,USA.2Department of Biostatistics,East Carolina University,Greenville,NC,USA.1Department of Public Health,Brody School of Medicine,East Carolina University,600 Moye Blvd,MS 660,Lakeside Annex 7,Greenville,NC 27834,USA.1Department of Public Health,Brody School of Medicine,East Carolina University,600 Moye Blvd,MS 660,Lakeside Annex 7,Greenville,NC 27834,USA.1Department of Public Health,Brody School of Medicine,East Carolina University,600 Moye Blvd,MS 660,Lakeside Annex 7,Greenville,NC 27834,USA.3Department of Nutrition,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,NC,USA.3Department of Nutrition,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,NC,USA.4Department of Community Health,East Tennessee State University,Johnson City,TN,USA.3Department of Nutrition,University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,Chapel Hill,NC,USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25895894

Citation

Jilcott Pitts, Stephanie B., et al. "Farmers' Market Shopping and Dietary Behaviours Among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participants." Public Health Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 13, 2015, pp. 2407-14.
Jilcott Pitts SB, Wu Q, Demarest CL, et al. Farmers' market shopping and dietary behaviours among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(13):2407-14.
Jilcott Pitts, S. B., Wu, Q., Demarest, C. L., Dixon, C. E., Dortche, C. J., Bullock, S. L., McGuirt, J., Ward, R., & Ammerman, A. S. (2015). Farmers' market shopping and dietary behaviours among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants. Public Health Nutrition, 18(13), 2407-14. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980015001111
Jilcott Pitts SB, et al. Farmers' Market Shopping and Dietary Behaviours Among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Participants. Public Health Nutr. 2015;18(13):2407-14. PubMed PMID: 25895894.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Farmers' market shopping and dietary behaviours among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program participants. AU - Jilcott Pitts,Stephanie B, AU - Wu,Qiang, AU - Demarest,Chelsea L, AU - Dixon,Crystal E, AU - Dortche,Ciarra Jm, AU - Bullock,Sally L, AU - McGuirt,Jared, AU - Ward,Rachel, AU - Ammerman,Alice S, Y1 - 2015/04/21/ PY - 2015/4/22/entrez PY - 2015/4/22/pubmed PY - 2016/6/9/medline KW - Farmers’ markets KW - Fruit KW - Obesity KW - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program KW - Vegetables SP - 2407 EP - 14 JF - Public health nutrition JO - Public Health Nutr VL - 18 IS - 13 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Because farmers' markets include a variety of fruits and vegetables, shopping at farmers' markets would likely improve diet quality among low-income consumers, as well as promote sustainable direct farm-to-consumer business models. However, not much is known about how to promote farmers' market shopping among low-income consumers. Therefore, the purpose of the present paper was to examine barriers to and facilitators of shopping at farmers' markets and associations between shopping at farmers' markets and self-reported dietary behaviours (fruit and vegetable, sugar-sweetened beverage and fast-food consumption) and BMI. DESIGN: Cross-sectional analyses of associations between farmers' market shopping frequency, awareness of markets, access to markets, dietary behaviours and BMI. SETTING: Department of Social Services, Pitt County, eastern North Carolina, USA. SUBJECTS: Between April and July 2013, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participants (n 205) completed a quantitative survey. RESULTS: Barriers to shopping at farmers' markets included does not accept SNAP/electronic benefit transfer, out of the way and lack of transportation. Farmers' market shopping was associated with awareness of farmers' markets (estimate =0·18 (se 0·04), P<0·001). Fruit and vegetable consumption was positively associated with farmers' market shopping (estimate =1·06 (se 0·32), P=0·001). CONCLUSIONS: Our study is one of the first to examine SNAP participants' farmers' market shopping, distance to farmers' markets and dietary behaviours. Barriers to shopping at farmers' markets and increasing awareness of existing markets should be addressed in future interventions to increase SNAP participants' use of farmers' markets, ultimately improving diet quality in this high-risk group. SN - 1475-2727 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25895894/Farmers'_market_shopping_and_dietary_behaviours_among_Supplemental_Nutrition_Assistance_Program_participants_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S1368980015001111/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -