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Multi-dimensional balance training programme improves balance and gait performance in people with Parkinson's disease: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up.
Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2015 Jun; 21(6):615-21.PR

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Previous studies have demonstrated that exercise interventions can improve balance and gait performance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), but most training did not target all balance domains and was conducted mainly indoors.

OBJECTIVES

To investigate the short- and long-term effects of a multi-dimensional indoor and outdoor exercise programme on balance, balance confidence and gait performance in people with PD.

METHODS

Eligible subjects with PD were randomly assigned to an eight-week indoor and outdoor balance training (EXP, N = 41) group or upper limb exercise (CON, N = 43) group. Outcome measures included BESTest total and subsection scores, gait speed, dual-task timed-up-and-go (dual-task TUG) time and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) score. All outcomes were assessed before training (Pre), immediately after intervention (Post) and at six-month (FU6m) and twelve-month (FU12m) follow-ups.

RESULTS

Immediately after training, EXP group showed more significant improvements than CON group in BESTest total and subsection scores, gait speed and dual-task TUG time (p < 0.05). At both FU6m and FU12m, EXP group showed significantly greater gains than CON group in BESTest total and subsection scores and dual-task TUG time (p < 0.05). EXP group also showed significantly greater increase in the gait speed than CON group at FU6m (p < 0.05).

CONCLUSION

The positive findings of this study provide evidence that this multi-dimensional balance training programme can enhance balance and dual-task gait performance up to 12-month follow-up in people with PD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, China.Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Hong Kong, China. Electronic address: Margaret.Mak@polyu.edu.hk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25899544

Citation

Wong-Yu, Irene S K., and Margaret K Y. Mak. "Multi-dimensional Balance Training Programme Improves Balance and Gait Performance in People With Parkinson's Disease: a Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial With 12-month Follow-up." Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, vol. 21, no. 6, 2015, pp. 615-21.
Wong-Yu IS, Mak MK. Multi-dimensional balance training programme improves balance and gait performance in people with Parkinson's disease: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2015;21(6):615-21.
Wong-Yu, I. S., & Mak, M. K. (2015). Multi-dimensional balance training programme improves balance and gait performance in people with Parkinson's disease: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. Parkinsonism & Related Disorders, 21(6), 615-21. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2015.03.022
Wong-Yu IS, Mak MK. Multi-dimensional Balance Training Programme Improves Balance and Gait Performance in People With Parkinson's Disease: a Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial With 12-month Follow-up. Parkinsonism Relat Disord. 2015;21(6):615-21. PubMed PMID: 25899544.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Multi-dimensional balance training programme improves balance and gait performance in people with Parkinson's disease: A pragmatic randomized controlled trial with 12-month follow-up. AU - Wong-Yu,Irene S K, AU - Mak,Margaret K Y, Y1 - 2015/03/31/ PY - 2014/12/08/received PY - 2015/03/11/revised PY - 2015/03/22/accepted PY - 2015/4/23/entrez PY - 2015/4/23/pubmed PY - 2016/5/3/medline KW - Accidental falls KW - Exercise therapy KW - Parkinson disease KW - Postural balance KW - Randomized controlled trial KW - Rehabilitation SP - 615 EP - 21 JF - Parkinsonism & related disorders JO - Parkinsonism Relat Disord VL - 21 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Previous studies have demonstrated that exercise interventions can improve balance and gait performance in people with Parkinson's disease (PD), but most training did not target all balance domains and was conducted mainly indoors. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the short- and long-term effects of a multi-dimensional indoor and outdoor exercise programme on balance, balance confidence and gait performance in people with PD. METHODS: Eligible subjects with PD were randomly assigned to an eight-week indoor and outdoor balance training (EXP, N = 41) group or upper limb exercise (CON, N = 43) group. Outcome measures included BESTest total and subsection scores, gait speed, dual-task timed-up-and-go (dual-task TUG) time and Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC) score. All outcomes were assessed before training (Pre), immediately after intervention (Post) and at six-month (FU6m) and twelve-month (FU12m) follow-ups. RESULTS: Immediately after training, EXP group showed more significant improvements than CON group in BESTest total and subsection scores, gait speed and dual-task TUG time (p < 0.05). At both FU6m and FU12m, EXP group showed significantly greater gains than CON group in BESTest total and subsection scores and dual-task TUG time (p < 0.05). EXP group also showed significantly greater increase in the gait speed than CON group at FU6m (p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The positive findings of this study provide evidence that this multi-dimensional balance training programme can enhance balance and dual-task gait performance up to 12-month follow-up in people with PD. SN - 1873-5126 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25899544/Multi_dimensional_balance_training_programme_improves_balance_and_gait_performance_in_people_with_Parkinson's_disease:_A_pragmatic_randomized_controlled_trial_with_12_month_follow_up_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1353-8020(15)00125-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -