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Heavy Smoking Is Associated With Lower Age at First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis and a Higher Risk of Recurrence.
Pancreas 2015; 44(6):876-81P

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

There is limited data on cigarette smoking and the risk of acute pancreatitis (AP). We evaluated the influence of cigarette smoking on AP risk and clinical presentation in a large cohort of Veteran's Administration (VA) patients.

METHODS

Retrospective study of VA patients from 1998 to 2007. Exclusion criteria included (1) history of chronic pancreatitis (n = 3222) or gallstones (n = 14,574) and (2) age younger than 15 years (n = 270). A 2-year washout period was used to exclude patients with pre-existing recurrent AP.

RESULTS

The study included 484,624 patients. From 2001 to 2007, a total of 6799 (1.4%) patients had AP. Alcohol (risk ratio, 4.20) and smoking (risk ratio, 1.78) were independent significant risk factors of AP on multiple regression analysis. Smoking increased the risk of AP in both nonalcoholics (0.57% vs 1.1%) and alcoholics (2.6% vs 4.1%). Smoking was associated with younger mean age at first episode of AP and higher likelihood of recurrent AP (≥4 episodes) in both nonalcoholics and alcoholics. The interval between recurrent episodes was not altered by alcohol or smoking.

CONCLUSIONS

In a large cohort of VA patients, smoking is an independent risk factor for AP and augmented the effect of alcohol on the risk, age of onset, and recurrence of AP.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the *Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University, St Louis, MO; †Center for Pancreatic Disease, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Endoscopy, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA; and ‡Center for Pancreatic Disorders, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25906444

Citation

Munigala, Satish, et al. "Heavy Smoking Is Associated With Lower Age at First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis and a Higher Risk of Recurrence." Pancreas, vol. 44, no. 6, 2015, pp. 876-81.
Munigala S, Conwell DL, Gelrud A, et al. Heavy Smoking Is Associated With Lower Age at First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis and a Higher Risk of Recurrence. Pancreas. 2015;44(6):876-81.
Munigala, S., Conwell, D. L., Gelrud, A., & Agarwal, B. (2015). Heavy Smoking Is Associated With Lower Age at First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis and a Higher Risk of Recurrence. Pancreas, 44(6), pp. 876-81. doi:10.1097/MPA.0000000000000364.
Munigala S, et al. Heavy Smoking Is Associated With Lower Age at First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis and a Higher Risk of Recurrence. Pancreas. 2015;44(6):876-81. PubMed PMID: 25906444.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heavy Smoking Is Associated With Lower Age at First Episode of Acute Pancreatitis and a Higher Risk of Recurrence. AU - Munigala,Satish, AU - Conwell,Darwin L, AU - Gelrud,Andres, AU - Agarwal,Banke, PY - 2015/4/24/entrez PY - 2015/4/24/pubmed PY - 2016/4/12/medline SP - 876 EP - 81 JF - Pancreas JO - Pancreas VL - 44 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: There is limited data on cigarette smoking and the risk of acute pancreatitis (AP). We evaluated the influence of cigarette smoking on AP risk and clinical presentation in a large cohort of Veteran's Administration (VA) patients. METHODS: Retrospective study of VA patients from 1998 to 2007. Exclusion criteria included (1) history of chronic pancreatitis (n = 3222) or gallstones (n = 14,574) and (2) age younger than 15 years (n = 270). A 2-year washout period was used to exclude patients with pre-existing recurrent AP. RESULTS: The study included 484,624 patients. From 2001 to 2007, a total of 6799 (1.4%) patients had AP. Alcohol (risk ratio, 4.20) and smoking (risk ratio, 1.78) were independent significant risk factors of AP on multiple regression analysis. Smoking increased the risk of AP in both nonalcoholics (0.57% vs 1.1%) and alcoholics (2.6% vs 4.1%). Smoking was associated with younger mean age at first episode of AP and higher likelihood of recurrent AP (≥4 episodes) in both nonalcoholics and alcoholics. The interval between recurrent episodes was not altered by alcohol or smoking. CONCLUSIONS: In a large cohort of VA patients, smoking is an independent risk factor for AP and augmented the effect of alcohol on the risk, age of onset, and recurrence of AP. SN - 1536-4828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25906444/Heavy_Smoking_Is_Associated_With_Lower_Age_at_First_Episode_of_Acute_Pancreatitis_and_a_Higher_Risk_of_Recurrence_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=25906444 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -