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Decreased Severity in Recurrent Versus Initial Episodes of Acute Pancreatitis.
Pancreas 2015; 44(6):896-900P

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

The comparative outcomes of initial versus recurrent acute pancreatitis (AP) have not been clearly established.

AIM

The aim was to compare the clinical outcomes of those with an initial episode of AP to those with recurrent AP stratified by the number of prior episodes.

METHODS

This retrospective cohort study included consecutive patients with AP admitted to the Cleveland Clinic between 2008 and 2011. The odds of severe AP, multisystem organ failure, ICU admission, new local complications, elevated blood urea nitrogen and bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis score, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and mortality were compared using univariable and multivariable logistic regression.

RESULTS

Two hundred and ninety two patients were included, of which 213 (72%) were admitted on their initial AP episode. Mortality in patients experiencing first episode was 4.7%, compared to 0% in patients with recurrent attack of pancreatitis (P = 0.047). Prior episodes of AP were found to be protective against multisystem organ failure (odds ratio, 0.14 for each prior episode; confidence interval, 0.01-0.76) and intensive care unit admission (0.24, confidence interval, 0.06-0.91), adjusting for potential confounding factors such as transfer status and obesity.

CONCLUSIONS

Patients presenting with recurrent AP may be at decreased risk of a clinically severe course and incur decreased mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the *Digestive Disease Institute, and †Department of Quantitative Health Sciences, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25906451

Citation

Lee, Peter J W., et al. "Decreased Severity in Recurrent Versus Initial Episodes of Acute Pancreatitis." Pancreas, vol. 44, no. 6, 2015, pp. 896-900.
Lee PJ, Bhatt A, Holmes J, et al. Decreased Severity in Recurrent Versus Initial Episodes of Acute Pancreatitis. Pancreas. 2015;44(6):896-900.
Lee, P. J., Bhatt, A., Holmes, J., Podugu, A., Lopez, R., Walsh, M., & Stevens, T. (2015). Decreased Severity in Recurrent Versus Initial Episodes of Acute Pancreatitis. Pancreas, 44(6), pp. 896-900. doi:10.1097/MPA.0000000000000354.
Lee PJ, et al. Decreased Severity in Recurrent Versus Initial Episodes of Acute Pancreatitis. Pancreas. 2015;44(6):896-900. PubMed PMID: 25906451.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Decreased Severity in Recurrent Versus Initial Episodes of Acute Pancreatitis. AU - Lee,Peter J W, AU - Bhatt,Amit, AU - Holmes,Jordan, AU - Podugu,Amareshwar, AU - Lopez,Rocio, AU - Walsh,Matthew, AU - Stevens,Tyler, PY - 2015/4/24/entrez PY - 2015/4/24/pubmed PY - 2016/4/12/medline SP - 896 EP - 900 JF - Pancreas JO - Pancreas VL - 44 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVES: The comparative outcomes of initial versus recurrent acute pancreatitis (AP) have not been clearly established. AIM: The aim was to compare the clinical outcomes of those with an initial episode of AP to those with recurrent AP stratified by the number of prior episodes. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included consecutive patients with AP admitted to the Cleveland Clinic between 2008 and 2011. The odds of severe AP, multisystem organ failure, ICU admission, new local complications, elevated blood urea nitrogen and bedside index for severity in acute pancreatitis score, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and mortality were compared using univariable and multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Two hundred and ninety two patients were included, of which 213 (72%) were admitted on their initial AP episode. Mortality in patients experiencing first episode was 4.7%, compared to 0% in patients with recurrent attack of pancreatitis (P = 0.047). Prior episodes of AP were found to be protective against multisystem organ failure (odds ratio, 0.14 for each prior episode; confidence interval, 0.01-0.76) and intensive care unit admission (0.24, confidence interval, 0.06-0.91), adjusting for potential confounding factors such as transfer status and obesity. CONCLUSIONS: Patients presenting with recurrent AP may be at decreased risk of a clinically severe course and incur decreased mortality. SN - 1536-4828 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25906451/Decreased_Severity_in_Recurrent_Versus_Initial_Episodes_of_Acute_Pancreatitis_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=25906451 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -