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Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication.
Women Health. 2015; 55(6):717-36.WH

Abstract

Few studies have focused on the health and health care of U.S. black lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women. To understand the facilitators of and barriers to cervical cancer screening in this population, focus group discussions were conducted in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts between November and December 2012. Using purposive sampling methods, the authors enrolled 18 black LBQ women who participated in one of four focus groups. Using thematic analysis, patient-provider communication was identified, which consisted of four sub-themes--health care provider communication style and demeanor; heteronormative provider assumptions; heterosexism, racism, and classism; and provider professional and sociodemographic background--as the most salient theme. Participants reported fears and experiences of multiple forms of discrimination and preferred receiving care from providers who were knowledgeable about same-sex sexual health and shared their life experiences at the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The cervical cancer screening experiences of black LBQ women would be improved by training all health care providers in same-sex sexual health, offering opportunities for clinicians to learn about the effects of various forms of discrimination on women's health care, and increasing the presence of LBQ women of color in health care settings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences , Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health , Boston , Massachusetts , USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25909663

Citation

Agénor, Madina, et al. "Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: the Role of Patient-Provider Communication." Women & Health, vol. 55, no. 6, 2015, pp. 717-36.
Agénor M, Bailey Z, Krieger N, et al. Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication. Women Health. 2015;55(6):717-36.
Agénor, M., Bailey, Z., Krieger, N., Austin, S. B., & Gottlieb, B. R. (2015). Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication. Women & Health, 55(6), 717-36. https://doi.org/10.1080/03630242.2015.1039182
Agénor M, et al. Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: the Role of Patient-Provider Communication. Women Health. 2015;55(6):717-36. PubMed PMID: 25909663.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exploring the Cervical Cancer Screening Experiences of Black Lesbian, Bisexual, and Queer Women: The Role of Patient-Provider Communication. AU - Agénor,Madina, AU - Bailey,Zinzi, AU - Krieger,Nancy, AU - Austin,S Bryn, AU - Gottlieb,Barbara R, Y1 - 2015/04/24/ PY - 2015/4/25/entrez PY - 2015/4/25/pubmed PY - 2016/1/14/medline KW - bisexual KW - cervical cancer screening KW - discrimination KW - lesbian KW - race KW - racism KW - sexual orientation SP - 717 EP - 36 JF - Women & health JO - Women Health VL - 55 IS - 6 N2 - Few studies have focused on the health and health care of U.S. black lesbian, bisexual, and queer (LBQ) women. To understand the facilitators of and barriers to cervical cancer screening in this population, focus group discussions were conducted in Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts between November and December 2012. Using purposive sampling methods, the authors enrolled 18 black LBQ women who participated in one of four focus groups. Using thematic analysis, patient-provider communication was identified, which consisted of four sub-themes--health care provider communication style and demeanor; heteronormative provider assumptions; heterosexism, racism, and classism; and provider professional and sociodemographic background--as the most salient theme. Participants reported fears and experiences of multiple forms of discrimination and preferred receiving care from providers who were knowledgeable about same-sex sexual health and shared their life experiences at the intersection of gender, race/ethnicity, and sexual orientation. The cervical cancer screening experiences of black LBQ women would be improved by training all health care providers in same-sex sexual health, offering opportunities for clinicians to learn about the effects of various forms of discrimination on women's health care, and increasing the presence of LBQ women of color in health care settings. SN - 1541-0331 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25909663/Exploring_the_Cervical_Cancer_Screening_Experiences_of_Black_Lesbian_Bisexual_and_Queer_Women:_The_Role_of_Patient_Provider_Communication_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/03630242.2015.1039182 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -