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Methods to determine effects of cranberry proanthocyanidins on extraintestinal infections: Relevance for urinary tract health.
Mol Nutr Food Res 2015; 59(7):1292-306MN

Abstract

Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most frequent extraintestinal infections caused by Escherichia coli (ExPEC). Cranberry juice has been used for decades to alleviate symptoms and prevent recurrent UTI. The putative compounds in cranberries are proanthocyanidins (PAC), specifically PAC with "A-type" bonds. Since PAC are not absorbed, their health benefits in UTI may occur through interactions at the mucosal surface in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent research showed that higher agglutination of ExPEC and reduced bacterial invasion are correlated with higher number of "A-type" bonds and higher degree of polymerization of PAC. An understanding of PAC structure-activity relationship is becoming feasible due to advancements, not only in obtaining purified PAC fractions that allow accurate estimation, but also in high-resolution MS methodologies, specifically, MALDI-TOF MS. A recent MALDI-TOF MS deconvolution method allows quantification of the ratios of "A-type" to "B-type" bonds enabling characteristic fingerprints. Moreover, the generation of fluorescently labeled PAC allows visualization of the interaction between ExPEC and PAC with microscopy. These tools can be used to establish structure-activity relationships between PAC and UTI and give insight on the mechanism of action of these compounds in the gut without being absorbed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Food Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA. Reed Research Group, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA.Reed Research Group, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA. Complete Phytochemical Solutions LLC, Cambridge, WI, USA.Reed Research Group, Department of Animal Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA. Complete Phytochemical Solutions LLC, Cambridge, WI, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25917127

Citation

Feliciano, Rodrigo P., et al. "Methods to Determine Effects of Cranberry Proanthocyanidins On Extraintestinal Infections: Relevance for Urinary Tract Health." Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, vol. 59, no. 7, 2015, pp. 1292-306.
Feliciano RP, Krueger CG, Reed JD. Methods to determine effects of cranberry proanthocyanidins on extraintestinal infections: Relevance for urinary tract health. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015;59(7):1292-306.
Feliciano, R. P., Krueger, C. G., & Reed, J. D. (2015). Methods to determine effects of cranberry proanthocyanidins on extraintestinal infections: Relevance for urinary tract health. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 59(7), pp. 1292-306. doi:10.1002/mnfr.201500108.
Feliciano RP, Krueger CG, Reed JD. Methods to Determine Effects of Cranberry Proanthocyanidins On Extraintestinal Infections: Relevance for Urinary Tract Health. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2015;59(7):1292-306. PubMed PMID: 25917127.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Methods to determine effects of cranberry proanthocyanidins on extraintestinal infections: Relevance for urinary tract health. AU - Feliciano,Rodrigo P, AU - Krueger,Christian G, AU - Reed,Jess D, Y1 - 2015/06/01/ PY - 2015/02/09/received PY - 2015/03/31/revised PY - 2015/04/23/accepted PY - 2015/4/29/entrez PY - 2015/4/29/pubmed PY - 2016/4/27/medline KW - Cranberry KW - Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli KW - MALDI-TOF MS KW - Urinary tract infections KW - “A-type” proanthocyanidins SP - 1292 EP - 306 JF - Molecular nutrition & food research JO - Mol Nutr Food Res VL - 59 IS - 7 N2 - Urinary tract infections (UTI) are one of the most frequent extraintestinal infections caused by Escherichia coli (ExPEC). Cranberry juice has been used for decades to alleviate symptoms and prevent recurrent UTI. The putative compounds in cranberries are proanthocyanidins (PAC), specifically PAC with "A-type" bonds. Since PAC are not absorbed, their health benefits in UTI may occur through interactions at the mucosal surface in the gastrointestinal tract. Recent research showed that higher agglutination of ExPEC and reduced bacterial invasion are correlated with higher number of "A-type" bonds and higher degree of polymerization of PAC. An understanding of PAC structure-activity relationship is becoming feasible due to advancements, not only in obtaining purified PAC fractions that allow accurate estimation, but also in high-resolution MS methodologies, specifically, MALDI-TOF MS. A recent MALDI-TOF MS deconvolution method allows quantification of the ratios of "A-type" to "B-type" bonds enabling characteristic fingerprints. Moreover, the generation of fluorescently labeled PAC allows visualization of the interaction between ExPEC and PAC with microscopy. These tools can be used to establish structure-activity relationships between PAC and UTI and give insight on the mechanism of action of these compounds in the gut without being absorbed. SN - 1613-4133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25917127/Methods_to_determine_effects_of_cranberry_proanthocyanidins_on_extraintestinal_infections:_Relevance_for_urinary_tract_health_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201500108 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -