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Histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers.
Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015 Jun; 92(6):1168-72.AJ

Abstract

Histoplasmosis is a common endemic human mycoses acquired mostly in the Americas. We reviewed 23 cases of histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers; 22 had traveled to Central or South America and one to North America. Fourteen cases had been exposed to bat habitats and were symptomatic, presenting ≤ 3 months after their return. Asymptomatic patients (N = 9) were diagnosed during the evaluation of incidental radiological findings or because a travel partner had been suspected of Histoplasma infection, 16-120 months after their return. Serological testing was positive in 75% of symptomatic cases but only 22% of asymptomatic cases. Histoplasmosis should be considered in travelers returning from the Americas with respiratory or febrile illness within weeks of return, particularly if exposed to bat habitats. Travel history is essential in patients presenting with pulmonary nodules, even years after travel to endemic countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Pulmonology, Department of Imaging, Internal Medicine "C" and Center for Geographic Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute of Pulmonology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine B, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.Institute of Pulmonology, Department of Imaging, Internal Medicine "C" and Center for Geographic Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute of Pulmonology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine B, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.Institute of Pulmonology, Department of Imaging, Internal Medicine "C" and Center for Geographic Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute of Pulmonology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine B, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.Institute of Pulmonology, Department of Imaging, Internal Medicine "C" and Center for Geographic Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute of Pulmonology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine B, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.Institute of Pulmonology, Department of Imaging, Internal Medicine "C" and Center for Geographic Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute of Pulmonology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine B, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.Institute of Pulmonology, Department of Imaging, Internal Medicine "C" and Center for Geographic Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute of Pulmonology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine B, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel.Institute of Pulmonology, Department of Imaging, Internal Medicine "C" and Center for Geographic Medicine, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel HaShomer, Ramat Gan, Israel; Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel; Mycotic Diseases Branch, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia; Infectious Diseases Unit, Shaare-Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute of Pulmonology, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel; Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; Unit of Infectious Diseases, Internal Medicine B, Rambam Medical Center, Haifa, Israel elischwa@post.tau.ac.il.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25918200

Citation

Segel, Michael J., et al. "Histoplasmosis in Israeli Travelers." The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 92, no. 6, 2015, pp. 1168-72.
Segel MJ, Rozenman J, Lindsley MD, et al. Histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;92(6):1168-72.
Segel, M. J., Rozenman, J., Lindsley, M. D., Lachish, T., Berkman, N., Neuberger, A., & Schwartz, E. (2015). Histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers. The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 92(6), 1168-72. https://doi.org/10.4269/ajtmh.14-0509
Segel MJ, et al. Histoplasmosis in Israeli Travelers. Am J Trop Med Hyg. 2015;92(6):1168-72. PubMed PMID: 25918200.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers. AU - Segel,Michael J, AU - Rozenman,Judith, AU - Lindsley,Mark D, AU - Lachish,Tamar, AU - Berkman,Neville, AU - Neuberger,Ami, AU - Schwartz,Eli, Y1 - 2015/04/27/ PY - 2014/08/11/received PY - 2015/01/09/accepted PY - 2015/4/29/entrez PY - 2015/4/29/pubmed PY - 2015/8/25/medline SP - 1168 EP - 72 JF - The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene JO - Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. VL - 92 IS - 6 N2 - Histoplasmosis is a common endemic human mycoses acquired mostly in the Americas. We reviewed 23 cases of histoplasmosis in Israeli travelers; 22 had traveled to Central or South America and one to North America. Fourteen cases had been exposed to bat habitats and were symptomatic, presenting ≤ 3 months after their return. Asymptomatic patients (N = 9) were diagnosed during the evaluation of incidental radiological findings or because a travel partner had been suspected of Histoplasma infection, 16-120 months after their return. Serological testing was positive in 75% of symptomatic cases but only 22% of asymptomatic cases. Histoplasmosis should be considered in travelers returning from the Americas with respiratory or febrile illness within weeks of return, particularly if exposed to bat habitats. Travel history is essential in patients presenting with pulmonary nodules, even years after travel to endemic countries. SN - 1476-1645 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25918200/Histoplasmosis_in_Israeli_travelers_ L2 - http://www.ajtmh.org/content/journals/10.4269/ajtmh.14-0509?crawler=true&mimetype=application/pdf DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -