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Body weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

Abstract

While the relationship between body mass index as an indicator of excess body weight and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is well established, the association between body weight gain in adulthood and risk of CRC remains unresolved. We quantified this association in a meta-analysis of 12 observational studies published until November 2014 with a total of 16,151 incident CRC cases. Random effect models were used to obtain summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I(2) statistics. Overall, the summary RR (95% CI) was 1.22 (1.14-1.30) for high body weight gain (midpoint: 15.2 kg) compared with stable weight (P for heterogeneity = 0.182; I(2) = 21.2%). In a dose-response analysis, each 5 kg weight gain was associated with a 4% (95% CI: 2%-5%) higher risk of CRC. The association persisted after adjustment for body weight at younger age and was present for both men and women, as well as for colon and rectal cancer. Differences by sex were detected for colon cancer (P for interaction = 0.003, with higher risk for men than women), but not for rectal cancer (P for interaction = 0.613). In conclusion, these data underscore the importance of body weight management from early adulthood onwards for the prevention of CRC development.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Institute of Epidemiology, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.

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    Institute of Epidemiology, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.

    ,

    Institute of Epidemiology, Christian-Albrechts University of Kiel, Kiel, Germany.

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    Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.

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    Section for Epidemiology, Department of Public Health, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.

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    Molecular Epidemiology Group, Max Delbrueck Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC), Berlin-Buch, Germany.

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    Department of Nutrition and Food Sciences, Nutritional Epidemiology, University of Bonn, Bonn, Germany.

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    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.

    Department of Epidemiology, German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbrücke, Nuthetal, Germany.

    Source

    MeSH

    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Humans
    Obesity
    Observational Studies as Topic
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Risk Reduction Behavior
    Sex Factors
    Waist Circumference
    Weight Gain

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Review
    Systematic Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    25925734

    Citation

    Schlesinger, S, et al. "Body Weight Gain and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies." Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 16, no. 7, 2015, pp. 607-19.
    Schlesinger S, Lieb W, Koch M, et al. Body weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Obes Rev. 2015;16(7):607-19.
    Schlesinger, S., Lieb, W., Koch, M., Fedirko, V., Dahm, C. C., Pischon, T., ... Aleksandrova, K. (2015). Body weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Obesity Reviews : an Official Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, 16(7), pp. 607-19. doi:10.1111/obr.12286.
    Schlesinger S, et al. Body Weight Gain and Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Observational Studies. Obes Rev. 2015;16(7):607-19. PubMed PMID: 25925734.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Body weight gain and risk of colorectal cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. AU - Schlesinger,S, AU - Lieb,W, AU - Koch,M, AU - Fedirko,V, AU - Dahm,C C, AU - Pischon,T, AU - Nöthlings,U, AU - Boeing,H, AU - Aleksandrova,K, Y1 - 2015/04/29/ PY - 2015/01/16/received PY - 2015/04/01/revised PY - 2015/04/01/accepted PY - 2015/5/1/entrez PY - 2015/5/1/pubmed PY - 2016/5/18/medline KW - Body weight gain KW - colorectal neoplasms KW - meta-analysis KW - observational studies SP - 607 EP - 19 JF - Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity JO - Obes Rev VL - 16 IS - 7 N2 - While the relationship between body mass index as an indicator of excess body weight and the risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) is well established, the association between body weight gain in adulthood and risk of CRC remains unresolved. We quantified this association in a meta-analysis of 12 observational studies published until November 2014 with a total of 16,151 incident CRC cases. Random effect models were used to obtain summary relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs). Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I(2) statistics. Overall, the summary RR (95% CI) was 1.22 (1.14-1.30) for high body weight gain (midpoint: 15.2 kg) compared with stable weight (P for heterogeneity = 0.182; I(2) = 21.2%). In a dose-response analysis, each 5 kg weight gain was associated with a 4% (95% CI: 2%-5%) higher risk of CRC. The association persisted after adjustment for body weight at younger age and was present for both men and women, as well as for colon and rectal cancer. Differences by sex were detected for colon cancer (P for interaction = 0.003, with higher risk for men than women), but not for rectal cancer (P for interaction = 0.613). In conclusion, these data underscore the importance of body weight management from early adulthood onwards for the prevention of CRC development. SN - 1467-789X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25925734/full_citation L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.12286 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -