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Eczema in early childhood, sociodemographic factors and lifestyle habits are associated with food allergy: a nested case-control study.
Int Arch Allergy Immunol 2015; 166(3):199-207IA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Studies suggest an increase in food allergy prevalence over the last decade, but the contributing factors remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the most common food allergies and atopic history, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits.

METHODS

We conducted a case-control study nested within the SPAACE study (Surveying Prevalence of Food Allergy in All Canadian Environments) – a cross-Canada, random telephone survey. Cases consisted of individuals with probable food allergy (self-report of convincing symptoms and/or physician diagnosis) to milk, egg, peanut, tree nut, shellfish, fish, wheat, soy, or sesame. Controls consisted of nonallergic individuals, matched for age. Cases and controls were queried on personal and family history of atopy, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between atopy, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits with probable food allergy.

RESULTS

Between September 2010 and September 2011, 480 cases and 4,950 controls completed the questionnaire. For all 9 allergens, factors associated with a higher risk of probable allergy were as follows: (1) personal history of eczema (in the first 2 years of life), asthma or hay fever (odds ratio, OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6-3.5; OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.2-3.6, and OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.8-3.0, respectively), (2) maternal, paternal or sibling's food allergy (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.5-5.6; OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.8-5.1, and OR 3.1, 95% CI 2.2-4.2), (3) high household income (top 20%; OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-2.0). Males and older individuals were less likely to have food allergy (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.9, and OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00). Eczema in the first 2 years of life was the strongest risk factor for egg, peanut, tree nut and fish allergy.

CONCLUSIONS

This is the largest population-based nested case-control study exploring factors associated with food allergies. Our results reveal that, in addition to previously reported factors, eczema in the first 2 years of life is consistently associated with food allergies.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Pediatric Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Department of Pediatrics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Que., Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25926095

Citation

Ben-Shoshan, Moshe, et al. "Eczema in Early Childhood, Sociodemographic Factors and Lifestyle Habits Are Associated With Food Allergy: a Nested Case-control Study." International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, vol. 166, no. 3, 2015, pp. 199-207.
Ben-Shoshan M, Soller L, Harrington DW, et al. Eczema in early childhood, sociodemographic factors and lifestyle habits are associated with food allergy: a nested case-control study. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2015;166(3):199-207.
Ben-Shoshan, M., Soller, L., Harrington, D. W., Knoll, M., La Vieille, S., Fragapane, J., ... Clarke, A. E. (2015). Eczema in early childhood, sociodemographic factors and lifestyle habits are associated with food allergy: a nested case-control study. International Archives of Allergy and Immunology, 166(3), pp. 199-207. doi:10.1159/000381829.
Ben-Shoshan M, et al. Eczema in Early Childhood, Sociodemographic Factors and Lifestyle Habits Are Associated With Food Allergy: a Nested Case-control Study. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2015;166(3):199-207. PubMed PMID: 25926095.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Eczema in early childhood, sociodemographic factors and lifestyle habits are associated with food allergy: a nested case-control study. AU - Ben-Shoshan,Moshe, AU - Soller,Lianne, AU - Harrington,Daniel W, AU - Knoll,Megan, AU - La Vieille,Sebastian, AU - Fragapane,Joseph, AU - Joseph,Lawrence, AU - St Pierre,Yvan, AU - Wilson,Kathie, AU - Elliott,Susan J, AU - Clarke,Ann E, Y1 - 2015/04/22/ PY - 2014/10/06/received PY - 2015/03/23/accepted PY - 2015/5/1/entrez PY - 2015/5/1/pubmed PY - 2015/8/1/medline SP - 199 EP - 207 JF - International archives of allergy and immunology JO - Int. Arch. Allergy Immunol. VL - 166 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Studies suggest an increase in food allergy prevalence over the last decade, but the contributing factors remain unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the most common food allergies and atopic history, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study nested within the SPAACE study (Surveying Prevalence of Food Allergy in All Canadian Environments) – a cross-Canada, random telephone survey. Cases consisted of individuals with probable food allergy (self-report of convincing symptoms and/or physician diagnosis) to milk, egg, peanut, tree nut, shellfish, fish, wheat, soy, or sesame. Controls consisted of nonallergic individuals, matched for age. Cases and controls were queried on personal and family history of atopy, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between atopy, sociodemographic characteristics and lifestyle habits with probable food allergy. RESULTS: Between September 2010 and September 2011, 480 cases and 4,950 controls completed the questionnaire. For all 9 allergens, factors associated with a higher risk of probable allergy were as follows: (1) personal history of eczema (in the first 2 years of life), asthma or hay fever (odds ratio, OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.6-3.5; OR 2.8, 95% CI 2.2-3.6, and OR 2.3, 95% CI 1.8-3.0, respectively), (2) maternal, paternal or sibling's food allergy (OR 3.7, 95% CI 2.5-5.6; OR 3.0, 95% CI 1.8-5.1, and OR 3.1, 95% CI 2.2-4.2), (3) high household income (top 20%; OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2-2.0). Males and older individuals were less likely to have food allergy (OR 0.7, 95% CI 0.6-0.9, and OR 0.99, 95% CI 0.99-1.00). Eczema in the first 2 years of life was the strongest risk factor for egg, peanut, tree nut and fish allergy. CONCLUSIONS: This is the largest population-based nested case-control study exploring factors associated with food allergies. Our results reveal that, in addition to previously reported factors, eczema in the first 2 years of life is consistently associated with food allergies. SN - 1423-0097 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25926095/Eczema_in_early_childhood_sociodemographic_factors_and_lifestyle_habits_are_associated_with_food_allergy:_a_nested_case_control_study_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000381829 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -