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Race, vitamin D-binding protein gene polymorphisms, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and incident diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun; 101(6):1232-40.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is associated with diabetes, but few studies have examined racially diverse populations while also accounting for key vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) gene polymorphisms.

OBJECTIVE

We sought to evaluate whether the association between 25(OH)D and incident diabetes varied by race and important DBP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs).

DESIGN

We studied 10,222 adults (8120 whites, 2102 blacks) aged 46-70 y at baseline (1990-1992) from the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study with follow-up for incident diabetes ascertained during study visits conducted in 1993-1995 and 1996-1998. Adjusted HRs and their 95% CIs for diabetes were estimated according to 25(OH)D status.

RESULTS

During follow-up there were 750 incident cases of diabetes. The association of 25(OH)D with diabetes varied by race (P-interaction = 0.004). Among whites, the adjusted HR for diabetes corresponding to each additional SD higher 25(OH)D concentration (21.3 nmol/L) was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.99). No significant association was observed among blacks (HR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.14). There was evidence that the A allele at rs4588 and the T allele at rs7041, which are reported to be associated with high and low DBP concentrations, respectively, modified the association between 25(OH)D and diabetes among whites (P-interaction < 0.05 for both) but not blacks (P-interaction > 0.50 for both).

CONCLUSIONS

In this large, community-based study, low 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with diabetes among whites but not blacks. Interactions by key DBP SNPs varied between genotypes associated with either high or low DBP concentrations among whites but not blacks. Nevertheless, the findings from this prospective study suggest that there are important differences in the association of 25(OH)D with incident diabetes between white and black adults.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (JPR); the Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (EDM); the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (ES); and the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (JSP and PLL). reisjp@mail.nih.gov.From the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (JPR); the Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (EDM); the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (ES); and the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (JSP and PLL).From the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (JPR); the Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (EDM); the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (ES); and the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (JSP and PLL).From the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (JPR); the Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (EDM); the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (ES); and the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (JSP and PLL).From the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, MD (JPR); the Division of Cardiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (EDM); the Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD (ES); and the Division of Epidemiology and Community Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (JSP and PLL).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25926504

Citation

Reis, Jared P., et al. "Race, Vitamin D-binding Protein Gene Polymorphisms, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and Incident Diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 6, 2015, pp. 1232-40.
Reis JP, Michos ED, Selvin E, et al. Race, vitamin D-binding protein gene polymorphisms, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and incident diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(6):1232-40.
Reis, J. P., Michos, E. D., Selvin, E., Pankow, J. S., & Lutsey, P. L. (2015). Race, vitamin D-binding protein gene polymorphisms, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and incident diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(6), 1232-40. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.115.107334
Reis JP, et al. Race, Vitamin D-binding Protein Gene Polymorphisms, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and Incident Diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(6):1232-40. PubMed PMID: 25926504.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Race, vitamin D-binding protein gene polymorphisms, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, and incident diabetes: the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study. AU - Reis,Jared P, AU - Michos,Erin D, AU - Selvin,Elizabeth, AU - Pankow,James S, AU - Lutsey,Pamela L, Y1 - 2015/04/29/ PY - 2015/01/14/received PY - 2015/03/24/accepted PY - 2015/5/1/entrez PY - 2015/5/1/pubmed PY - 2015/8/8/medline KW - cohort study KW - diabetes KW - race KW - vitamin D binding protein polymorphisms SP - 1232 EP - 40 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 101 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Low 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is associated with diabetes, but few studies have examined racially diverse populations while also accounting for key vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) gene polymorphisms. OBJECTIVE: We sought to evaluate whether the association between 25(OH)D and incident diabetes varied by race and important DBP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). DESIGN: We studied 10,222 adults (8120 whites, 2102 blacks) aged 46-70 y at baseline (1990-1992) from the ARIC (Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities) Study with follow-up for incident diabetes ascertained during study visits conducted in 1993-1995 and 1996-1998. Adjusted HRs and their 95% CIs for diabetes were estimated according to 25(OH)D status. RESULTS: During follow-up there were 750 incident cases of diabetes. The association of 25(OH)D with diabetes varied by race (P-interaction = 0.004). Among whites, the adjusted HR for diabetes corresponding to each additional SD higher 25(OH)D concentration (21.3 nmol/L) was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.91, 0.99). No significant association was observed among blacks (HR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.99, 1.14). There was evidence that the A allele at rs4588 and the T allele at rs7041, which are reported to be associated with high and low DBP concentrations, respectively, modified the association between 25(OH)D and diabetes among whites (P-interaction < 0.05 for both) but not blacks (P-interaction > 0.50 for both). CONCLUSIONS: In this large, community-based study, low 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with diabetes among whites but not blacks. Interactions by key DBP SNPs varied between genotypes associated with either high or low DBP concentrations among whites but not blacks. Nevertheless, the findings from this prospective study suggest that there are important differences in the association of 25(OH)D with incident diabetes between white and black adults. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25926504/Race_vitamin_D_binding_protein_gene_polymorphisms_25_hydroxyvitamin_D_and_incident_diabetes:_the_Atherosclerosis_Risk_in_Communities__ARIC__Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.115.107334 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -