Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Severity of OSA is an independent predictor of incident atrial fibrillation hospitalization in a large sleep-clinic cohort.
Chest. 2015 Oct; 148(4):945-952.Chest

Abstract

BACKGROUND

OSA is a common condition that has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but there is a paucity of data from large longitudinal cohorts to establish whether OSA is a risk factor for AF independent of obesity and other established risk factors.

METHODS

We studied patients attending a sleep clinic referred for in-laboratory polysomnography for possible OSA between 1989 and 2001. Whole-population hospital data in Western Australia for 1970 to 2009 were linked to sleep study cases to determine incident AF hospitalization to 2009. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of OSA with incident AF.

RESULTS

Study case subjects (6,841) were predominantly middle aged (48.3 ± 12.5 years old) and men (77%), and 455 developed AF during a median 11.9 years of follow-up. Univariate predictors of AF included age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, valvular heart disease, coronary or peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and COPD (all P < .001). After multivariable adjustment, independent predictors of incident AF were an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) > 5/h (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% CI, 1.21-2.00), log (AHI + 1) (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.26), and log (time with oxygen saturation < 90% + 1) (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.19). There were no interactions between age, sex, or BMI and AHI for AF development.

CONCLUSIONS

OSA diagnosis and severity are independently associated with incident AF. Clinical trials are required to determine if treatment of OSA will reduce the burden of AF.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley.School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley; West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia. Electronic address: nigel.mcardle@uwa.edu.au.School of Population Health, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley.School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley; West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.Centre for Genetic Origins of Health and Disease, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley; School of Anatomy, Physiology and Human Biology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley; West Australian Sleep Disorders Research Institute, Department of Pulmonary Physiology and Sleep Medicine, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, WA, Australia.School of Population Health, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley.School of Medicine and Pharmacology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital Unit, University of Western Australia, Crawley.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25927872

Citation

Cadby, Gemma, et al. "Severity of OSA Is an Independent Predictor of Incident Atrial Fibrillation Hospitalization in a Large Sleep-clinic Cohort." Chest, vol. 148, no. 4, 2015, pp. 945-952.
Cadby G, McArdle N, Briffa T, et al. Severity of OSA is an independent predictor of incident atrial fibrillation hospitalization in a large sleep-clinic cohort. Chest. 2015;148(4):945-952.
Cadby, G., McArdle, N., Briffa, T., Hillman, D. R., Simpson, L., Knuiman, M., & Hung, J. (2015). Severity of OSA is an independent predictor of incident atrial fibrillation hospitalization in a large sleep-clinic cohort. Chest, 148(4), 945-952. https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.15-0229
Cadby G, et al. Severity of OSA Is an Independent Predictor of Incident Atrial Fibrillation Hospitalization in a Large Sleep-clinic Cohort. Chest. 2015;148(4):945-952. PubMed PMID: 25927872.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severity of OSA is an independent predictor of incident atrial fibrillation hospitalization in a large sleep-clinic cohort. AU - Cadby,Gemma, AU - McArdle,Nigel, AU - Briffa,Tom, AU - Hillman,David R, AU - Simpson,Laila, AU - Knuiman,Matthew, AU - Hung,Joseph, PY - 2015/5/1/entrez PY - 2015/5/1/pubmed PY - 2016/1/8/medline SP - 945 EP - 952 JF - Chest JO - Chest VL - 148 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: OSA is a common condition that has been associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but there is a paucity of data from large longitudinal cohorts to establish whether OSA is a risk factor for AF independent of obesity and other established risk factors. METHODS: We studied patients attending a sleep clinic referred for in-laboratory polysomnography for possible OSA between 1989 and 2001. Whole-population hospital data in Western Australia for 1970 to 2009 were linked to sleep study cases to determine incident AF hospitalization to 2009. Cox regression analyses were used to assess the independent association of OSA with incident AF. RESULTS: Study case subjects (6,841) were predominantly middle aged (48.3 ± 12.5 years old) and men (77%), and 455 developed AF during a median 11.9 years of follow-up. Univariate predictors of AF included age, BMI, hypertension, diabetes, valvular heart disease, coronary or peripheral artery disease, heart failure, and COPD (all P < .001). After multivariable adjustment, independent predictors of incident AF were an apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) > 5/h (hazard ratio [HR], 1.55; 95% CI, 1.21-2.00), log (AHI + 1) (HR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.06-1.26), and log (time with oxygen saturation < 90% + 1) (HR, 1.12; 95% CI, 1.06-1.19). There were no interactions between age, sex, or BMI and AHI for AF development. CONCLUSIONS: OSA diagnosis and severity are independently associated with incident AF. Clinical trials are required to determine if treatment of OSA will reduce the burden of AF. SN - 1931-3543 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25927872/Severity_of_OSA_is_an_independent_predictor_of_incident_atrial_fibrillation_hospitalization_in_a_large_sleep_clinic_cohort_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0012-3692(15)50283-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -