Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies.
Med Sci Monit 2015; 21:1249-55MS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Some epidemiological studies have suggested that vitamin E intake reduces the risk of pancreatic cancer; however, this conclusion has not been supported by all the published studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between vitamin E intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer by combining the results from published articles.

MATERIAL/METHODS

We searched the published studies that reported the relationship between vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk using the PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases through December 31st, 2014. Based on a fixed-effects or random-effects model, the RR and 95% CI were used to assess the combined risk.

RESULTS

In total, 10 observational studies (6 case-control studies and 4 cohort studies) were included. The overall RR (95% CI) of pancreatic cancer for the highest vs. the lowest level of vitamin E intake was 0.81 (0.73, 0.89). We found little evidence of heterogeneity (I2=19.8%, P=0.255). In the subgroup analyses, we found an inverse association between vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk both in the case-control and cohort studies. Additionally, this inverse association was not modified by different populations.

CONCLUSIONS

In our meta-analysis, there was an inverse association between vitamin E intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A high level of vitamin E might be a protective factor for populations at risk for pancreatic cancer.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (mainland).Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (mainland).Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (mainland).Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (mainland).Institute of Hepatobiliary Surgery, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing, China (mainland).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25929754

Citation

Peng, Lujian, et al. "Vitamin E Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies." Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, vol. 21, 2015, pp. 1249-55.
Peng L, Liu X, Lu Q, et al. Vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies. Med Sci Monit. 2015;21:1249-55.
Peng, L., Liu, X., Lu, Q., Tang, T., & Yang, Z. (2015). Vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies. Medical Science Monitor : International Medical Journal of Experimental and Clinical Research, 21, pp. 1249-55. doi:10.12659/MSM.893792.
Peng L, et al. Vitamin E Intake and Pancreatic Cancer Risk: a Meta-analysis of Observational Studies. Med Sci Monit. 2015 May 1;21:1249-55. PubMed PMID: 25929754.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies. AU - Peng,Lujian, AU - Liu,Xiangde, AU - Lu,Qian, AU - Tang,Tengqian, AU - Yang,Zhanyu, Y1 - 2015/05/01/ PY - 2015/5/2/entrez PY - 2015/5/2/pubmed PY - 2015/12/29/medline SP - 1249 EP - 55 JF - Medical science monitor : international medical journal of experimental and clinical research JO - Med. Sci. Monit. VL - 21 N2 - BACKGROUND: Some epidemiological studies have suggested that vitamin E intake reduces the risk of pancreatic cancer; however, this conclusion has not been supported by all the published studies. We conducted a meta-analysis to assess the relationship between vitamin E intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer by combining the results from published articles. MATERIAL/METHODS: We searched the published studies that reported the relationship between vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk using the PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase databases through December 31st, 2014. Based on a fixed-effects or random-effects model, the RR and 95% CI were used to assess the combined risk. RESULTS: In total, 10 observational studies (6 case-control studies and 4 cohort studies) were included. The overall RR (95% CI) of pancreatic cancer for the highest vs. the lowest level of vitamin E intake was 0.81 (0.73, 0.89). We found little evidence of heterogeneity (I2=19.8%, P=0.255). In the subgroup analyses, we found an inverse association between vitamin E intake and pancreatic cancer risk both in the case-control and cohort studies. Additionally, this inverse association was not modified by different populations. CONCLUSIONS: In our meta-analysis, there was an inverse association between vitamin E intake and the risk of pancreatic cancer. A high level of vitamin E might be a protective factor for populations at risk for pancreatic cancer. SN - 1643-3750 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25929754/Vitamin_E_intake_and_pancreatic_cancer_risk:_a_meta_analysis_of_observational_studies_ L2 - https://www.medscimonit.com/download/index/idArt/893792 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -