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Dietary ω-3 fatty acids protect against vasculopathy in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease.
Haematologica. 2015 Jul; 100(7):870-80.H

Abstract

The anemia of sickle cell disease is associated with a severe inflammatory vasculopathy and endothelial dysfunction, which leads to painful and life-threatening clinical complications. Growing evidence supports the anti-inflammatory properties of ω-3 fatty acids in clinical models of endothelial dysfunction. Promising but limited studies show potential therapeutic effects of ω-3 fatty acid supplementation in sickle cell disease. Here, we treated humanized healthy and sickle cell mice for 6 weeks with ω-3 fatty acid diet (fish-oil diet). We found that a ω-3 fatty acid diet: (i) normalizes red cell membrane ω-6/ω-3 ratio; (ii) reduces neutrophil count; (iii) decreases endothelial activation by targeting endothelin-1 and (iv) improves left ventricular outflow tract dimensions. In a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of acute vaso-occlusive crisis, a ω-3 fatty acid diet reduced systemic and local inflammation and protected against sickle cell-related end-organ injury. Using isolated aortas from sickle cell mice exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation, we demonstrated a direct impact of a ω-3 fatty acid diet on vascular activation, inflammation, and anti-oxidant systems. Our data provide the rationale for ω-3 dietary supplementation as a therapeutic intervention to reduce vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Surgery and The Vascular Biology Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Department of Medicine, University of Verona-AOUI Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy.Department of Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples, Italy.Department of Biochemistry, University Federico II, Naples, Italy.Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechology and Health Science, University of Turin, Italy.Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechology and Health Science, University of Turin, Italy.Department of Medicine, University of Verona-AOUI Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy.Molecular Biotechnology Center and Department of Molecular Biotechology and Health Science, University of Turin, Italy.Department of Medicine, University of Verona-AOUI Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy.Department of Surgery and The Vascular Biology Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.Departments of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA carlo.brugnara@childrens.harvard.edu.Department of Medicine, University of Verona-AOUI Verona, Policlinico GB Rossi, Verona, Italy.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25934765

Citation

Kalish, Brian T., et al. "Dietary Ω-3 Fatty Acids Protect Against Vasculopathy in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Sickle Cell Disease." Haematologica, vol. 100, no. 7, 2015, pp. 870-80.
Kalish BT, Matte A, Andolfo I, et al. Dietary ω-3 fatty acids protect against vasculopathy in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease. Haematologica. 2015;100(7):870-80.
Kalish, B. T., Matte, A., Andolfo, I., Iolascon, A., Weinberg, O., Ghigo, A., Cimino, J., Siciliano, A., Hirsch, E., Federti, E., Puder, M., Brugnara, C., & De Franceschi, L. (2015). Dietary ω-3 fatty acids protect against vasculopathy in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease. Haematologica, 100(7), 870-80. https://doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2015.124586
Kalish BT, et al. Dietary Ω-3 Fatty Acids Protect Against Vasculopathy in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Sickle Cell Disease. Haematologica. 2015;100(7):870-80. PubMed PMID: 25934765.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary ω-3 fatty acids protect against vasculopathy in a transgenic mouse model of sickle cell disease. AU - Kalish,Brian T, AU - Matte,Alessandro, AU - Andolfo,Immacolata, AU - Iolascon,Achille, AU - Weinberg,Olga, AU - Ghigo,Alessandra, AU - Cimino,James, AU - Siciliano,Angela, AU - Hirsch,Emilio, AU - Federti,Enrica, AU - Puder,Mark, AU - Brugnara,Carlo, AU - De Franceschi,Lucia, Y1 - 2015/05/01/ PY - 2015/02/02/received PY - 2015/04/27/accepted PY - 2015/5/3/entrez PY - 2015/5/3/pubmed PY - 2016/2/10/medline SP - 870 EP - 80 JF - Haematologica JO - Haematologica VL - 100 IS - 7 N2 - The anemia of sickle cell disease is associated with a severe inflammatory vasculopathy and endothelial dysfunction, which leads to painful and life-threatening clinical complications. Growing evidence supports the anti-inflammatory properties of ω-3 fatty acids in clinical models of endothelial dysfunction. Promising but limited studies show potential therapeutic effects of ω-3 fatty acid supplementation in sickle cell disease. Here, we treated humanized healthy and sickle cell mice for 6 weeks with ω-3 fatty acid diet (fish-oil diet). We found that a ω-3 fatty acid diet: (i) normalizes red cell membrane ω-6/ω-3 ratio; (ii) reduces neutrophil count; (iii) decreases endothelial activation by targeting endothelin-1 and (iv) improves left ventricular outflow tract dimensions. In a hypoxia-reoxygenation model of acute vaso-occlusive crisis, a ω-3 fatty acid diet reduced systemic and local inflammation and protected against sickle cell-related end-organ injury. Using isolated aortas from sickle cell mice exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation, we demonstrated a direct impact of a ω-3 fatty acid diet on vascular activation, inflammation, and anti-oxidant systems. Our data provide the rationale for ω-3 dietary supplementation as a therapeutic intervention to reduce vascular dysfunction in sickle cell disease. SN - 1592-8721 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25934765/Dietary_ω_3_fatty_acids_protect_against_vasculopathy_in_a_transgenic_mouse_model_of_sickle_cell_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.3324/haematol.2015.124586 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -