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Biomarkers of oxidative stress in rat for assessing toxicological effects of heavy metal pollution in river water.
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015 Sep; 22(17):13453-63.ES

Abstract

Increasing use of heavy metals in various fields, their environmental persistency, and poor regulatory efforts have significantly increased their fraction in river water. We studied the effect of Musi river water pollution on oxidative stress biomarkers and histopathology in rat after 28 days repeated oral treatment. River water analysis showed the presence of Zn and Pb at mg/l concentration and Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sn, and Sb at μg/l concentration. River water treatment resulted in a dose-dependent accumulation of metals in rat organs, being more in liver followed by kidney and brain. Metal content in both control and low-dose group rat organs was below limit of detection. However, metal bioaccumulation in high- and medium-dose group organs as follows: liver-Zn (21.4 & 14.5 μg/g), Cu (8.3 & 3.6 μg/g), and Pb (8.2 & 0.4 μg/g); kidney-Zn (16.2 & 7.9 μg/g), Cu (3.5 & 1.4 μg/g), Mn (2.9 & 0.5 μg/g), and Pb (2.6 & 0.5 μg/g); and brain-Zn (2.4 & 1.1 μg/g), and Ni (1 & 0.3 μg/g). These metals were present at high concentrations in respective organs than other metals. The increased heavy metal concentration in treated rat resulted significant increase in superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S transferase enzymes activity, and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. However, glutathione content and catalase activity were significantly decreased in treated rat organs. Histopathological examination also confirmed morphological changes in rat organs due to polluted river water treatment. In conclusion, the findings of this study clearly indicate the oxidative stress condition in rat organs due to repeated oral treatment of polluted Musi river water.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Toxicology Unit, Biology Division, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500007, India.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25940462

Citation

Reddy, Utkarsh A., et al. "Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Rat for Assessing Toxicological Effects of Heavy Metal Pollution in River Water." Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, vol. 22, no. 17, 2015, pp. 13453-63.
Reddy UA, Prabhakar PV, Rao GS, et al. Biomarkers of oxidative stress in rat for assessing toxicological effects of heavy metal pollution in river water. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015;22(17):13453-63.
Reddy, U. A., Prabhakar, P. V., Rao, G. S., Rao, P. R., Sandeep, K., Rahman, M. F., Kumari, S. I., Grover, P., Khan, H. A., & Mahboob, M. (2015). Biomarkers of oxidative stress in rat for assessing toxicological effects of heavy metal pollution in river water. Environmental Science and Pollution Research International, 22(17), 13453-63. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11356-015-4381-2
Reddy UA, et al. Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress in Rat for Assessing Toxicological Effects of Heavy Metal Pollution in River Water. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2015;22(17):13453-63. PubMed PMID: 25940462.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Biomarkers of oxidative stress in rat for assessing toxicological effects of heavy metal pollution in river water. AU - Reddy,Utkarsh A, AU - Prabhakar,P V, AU - Rao,G Sankara, AU - Rao,Pasham Rajasekhar, AU - Sandeep,K, AU - Rahman,M F, AU - Kumari,S Indu, AU - Grover,Paramjit, AU - Khan,Haseeb A, AU - Mahboob,M, Y1 - 2015/05/05/ PY - 2014/11/10/received PY - 2015/03/16/accepted PY - 2015/5/6/entrez PY - 2015/5/6/pubmed PY - 2016/3/26/medline SP - 13453 EP - 63 JF - Environmental science and pollution research international JO - Environ Sci Pollut Res Int VL - 22 IS - 17 N2 - Increasing use of heavy metals in various fields, their environmental persistency, and poor regulatory efforts have significantly increased their fraction in river water. We studied the effect of Musi river water pollution on oxidative stress biomarkers and histopathology in rat after 28 days repeated oral treatment. River water analysis showed the presence of Zn and Pb at mg/l concentration and Ag, As, Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Mo, Ni, Sn, and Sb at μg/l concentration. River water treatment resulted in a dose-dependent accumulation of metals in rat organs, being more in liver followed by kidney and brain. Metal content in both control and low-dose group rat organs was below limit of detection. However, metal bioaccumulation in high- and medium-dose group organs as follows: liver-Zn (21.4 & 14.5 μg/g), Cu (8.3 & 3.6 μg/g), and Pb (8.2 & 0.4 μg/g); kidney-Zn (16.2 & 7.9 μg/g), Cu (3.5 & 1.4 μg/g), Mn (2.9 & 0.5 μg/g), and Pb (2.6 & 0.5 μg/g); and brain-Zn (2.4 & 1.1 μg/g), and Ni (1 & 0.3 μg/g). These metals were present at high concentrations in respective organs than other metals. The increased heavy metal concentration in treated rat resulted significant increase in superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S transferase enzymes activity, and lipid peroxidation in a dose-dependent manner. However, glutathione content and catalase activity were significantly decreased in treated rat organs. Histopathological examination also confirmed morphological changes in rat organs due to polluted river water treatment. In conclusion, the findings of this study clearly indicate the oxidative stress condition in rat organs due to repeated oral treatment of polluted Musi river water. SN - 1614-7499 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25940462/Biomarkers_of_oxidative_stress_in_rat_for_assessing_toxicological_effects_of_heavy_metal_pollution_in_river_water_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11356-015-4381-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -