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Heat acclimatization does not improve VO2max or cycling performance in a cool climate in trained cyclists.
Scand J Med Sci Sports 2015; 25 Suppl 1:269-76SJ

Abstract

This study investigated if well-trained cyclists improve V ˙ O 2 m a x and performance in cool conditions following heat acclimatization through natural outdoor training in hot conditions. Eighteen trained male cyclists were tested for physiological adaptations, V ˙ O 2 m a x , peak aerobic power output, exercise efficiency, and outdoor time trial (TT) performance (43.4 km in cool environment, ∼5-13 °C) before and after 2 weeks of training in a cool (CON, n = 9) or hot (∼35 °C, HA, n = 9) environment. After heat acclimatization, TT performance in the heat was improved by 16%; however, there was no change in the HA group in V ˙ O 2 m a x (4.79 ± 0.21 L/min vs 4.82 ± 0.35 L/min), peak aerobic power output (417 ± 16 W vs 422 ± 17 W), and outdoor TT performance in cool conditions (300 ± 14 W/69 ± 3 min vs 302 ± 9 W/69 ± 4 min). The present study shows that 2 weeks of heat acclimatization was associated with marked improvements in TT performance in the heat. However, for the well-trained endurance athletes, this did not transfer to an improved aerobic exercise capacity or outdoor TT performance in cool conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, Aspetar Orthopaedic Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; Department of Nutrition, Exercise and Sport Sciences, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25943678

Citation

Karlsen, A, et al. "Heat Acclimatization Does Not Improve VO2max or Cycling Performance in a Cool Climate in Trained Cyclists." Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, vol. 25 Suppl 1, 2015, pp. 269-76.
Karlsen A, Racinais S, Jensen MV, et al. Heat acclimatization does not improve VO2max or cycling performance in a cool climate in trained cyclists. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015;25 Suppl 1:269-76.
Karlsen, A., Racinais, S., Jensen, M. V., Nørgaard, S. J., Bonne, T., & Nybo, L. (2015). Heat acclimatization does not improve VO2max or cycling performance in a cool climate in trained cyclists. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports, 25 Suppl 1, pp. 269-76. doi:10.1111/sms.12409.
Karlsen A, et al. Heat Acclimatization Does Not Improve VO2max or Cycling Performance in a Cool Climate in Trained Cyclists. Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2015;25 Suppl 1:269-76. PubMed PMID: 25943678.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heat acclimatization does not improve VO2max or cycling performance in a cool climate in trained cyclists. AU - Karlsen,A, AU - Racinais,S, AU - Jensen,M V, AU - Nørgaard,S J, AU - Bonne,T, AU - Nybo,L, PY - 2014/12/13/accepted PY - 2015/5/7/entrez PY - 2015/5/7/pubmed PY - 2016/1/28/medline KW - Maximal oxygen uptake KW - cycling KW - exercise efficiency KW - plasma volume KW - power output KW - time trial performance KW - well-trained athletes SP - 269 EP - 76 JF - Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports JO - Scand J Med Sci Sports VL - 25 Suppl 1 N2 - This study investigated if well-trained cyclists improve V ˙ O 2 m a x and performance in cool conditions following heat acclimatization through natural outdoor training in hot conditions. Eighteen trained male cyclists were tested for physiological adaptations, V ˙ O 2 m a x , peak aerobic power output, exercise efficiency, and outdoor time trial (TT) performance (43.4 km in cool environment, ∼5-13 °C) before and after 2 weeks of training in a cool (CON, n = 9) or hot (∼35 °C, HA, n = 9) environment. After heat acclimatization, TT performance in the heat was improved by 16%; however, there was no change in the HA group in V ˙ O 2 m a x (4.79 ± 0.21 L/min vs 4.82 ± 0.35 L/min), peak aerobic power output (417 ± 16 W vs 422 ± 17 W), and outdoor TT performance in cool conditions (300 ± 14 W/69 ± 3 min vs 302 ± 9 W/69 ± 4 min). The present study shows that 2 weeks of heat acclimatization was associated with marked improvements in TT performance in the heat. However, for the well-trained endurance athletes, this did not transfer to an improved aerobic exercise capacity or outdoor TT performance in cool conditions. SN - 1600-0838 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25943678/Heat_acclimatization_does_not_improve_VO2max_or_cycling_performance_in_a_cool_climate_in_trained_cyclists_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.12409 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -