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Association between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of stroke: 2 cohorts of US women and updated meta-analyses.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun; 101(6):1269-77.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Prospective data on the relation of magnesium, potassium, and calcium intakes with stroke risk are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, the effect of a combined mineral diet score has not been examined.

OBJECTIVE

We examined associations between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of incident stroke in 86,149 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I and 94,715 women in the NHS II.

DESIGN

In this prospective cohort study, we calculated HRs of stroke by quintiles of intake for each mineral and for a combined diet score of all 3 minerals by using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, we updated meta-analyses on dietary intakes of these minerals and risk of stroke.

RESULTS

During follow-up (30 y in the NHS I; 22 y in the NHS II) a total of 3780 incident stroke cases were documented. Pooled multivariate RRs of total stroke for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles were 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.97) for total magnesium, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.99) for total potassium, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.09) for total calcium intake. Pooled RRs for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of a combined mineral diet score were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.81) for total stroke, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.92) for ischemic stroke, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.04) for hemorrhagic stroke. In the updated meta-analyses of all prospective studies to date, the combined RR of total stroke was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.92) for a 100-mg/d increase in magnesium intake, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.94) for a 1000-mg/d increase in potassium intake, and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.02) for a 300-mg/d increase in calcium intake.

CONCLUSIONS

A combined mineral diet score was inversely associated with risk of stroke. High intakes of magnesium and potassium but not calcium were also significantly associated with reduced risk of stroke in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (SNA and KMR); the Departments of Department of Nutrition (SNA, DS, and WCW), Biostatistics (DS), Epidemiology (DS and WCW), and Global Health and Population (DS), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Boston, MA (WCW). sallya@mail.harvard.edu.From the Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (SNA and KMR); the Departments of Department of Nutrition (SNA, DS, and WCW), Biostatistics (DS), Epidemiology (DS and WCW), and Global Health and Population (DS), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Boston, MA (WCW).From the Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (SNA and KMR); the Departments of Department of Nutrition (SNA, DS, and WCW), Biostatistics (DS), Epidemiology (DS and WCW), and Global Health and Population (DS), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Boston, MA (WCW).From the Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA (SNA and KMR); the Departments of Department of Nutrition (SNA, DS, and WCW), Biostatistics (DS), Epidemiology (DS and WCW), and Global Health and Population (DS), Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA; and the Channing Division of Network Medicine, Boston, MA (WCW).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25948665

Citation

Adebamowo, Sally N., et al. "Association Between Intakes of Magnesium, Potassium, and Calcium and Risk of Stroke: 2 Cohorts of US Women and Updated Meta-analyses." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 6, 2015, pp. 1269-77.
Adebamowo SN, Spiegelman D, Willett WC, et al. Association between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of stroke: 2 cohorts of US women and updated meta-analyses. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(6):1269-77.
Adebamowo, S. N., Spiegelman, D., Willett, W. C., & Rexrode, K. M. (2015). Association between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of stroke: 2 cohorts of US women and updated meta-analyses. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(6), 1269-77. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.100354
Adebamowo SN, et al. Association Between Intakes of Magnesium, Potassium, and Calcium and Risk of Stroke: 2 Cohorts of US Women and Updated Meta-analyses. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(6):1269-77. PubMed PMID: 25948665.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of stroke: 2 cohorts of US women and updated meta-analyses. AU - Adebamowo,Sally N, AU - Spiegelman,Donna, AU - Willett,Walter C, AU - Rexrode,Kathryn M, Y1 - 2015/05/06/ PY - 2014/09/30/received PY - 2015/04/02/accepted PY - 2015/5/8/entrez PY - 2015/5/8/pubmed PY - 2015/8/8/medline KW - calcium KW - hemorrhagic stroke KW - ischemic stroke KW - magnesium KW - potassium KW - stroke SP - 1269 EP - 77 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 101 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Prospective data on the relation of magnesium, potassium, and calcium intakes with stroke risk are inconsistent, and to our knowledge, the effect of a combined mineral diet score has not been examined. OBJECTIVE: We examined associations between intakes of magnesium, potassium, and calcium and risk of incident stroke in 86,149 women in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) I and 94,715 women in the NHS II. DESIGN: In this prospective cohort study, we calculated HRs of stroke by quintiles of intake for each mineral and for a combined diet score of all 3 minerals by using multivariate Cox proportional hazard models. In addition, we updated meta-analyses on dietary intakes of these minerals and risk of stroke. RESULTS: During follow-up (30 y in the NHS I; 22 y in the NHS II) a total of 3780 incident stroke cases were documented. Pooled multivariate RRs of total stroke for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles were 0.87 (95% CI: 0.78, 0.97) for total magnesium, 0.89 (95% CI: 0.80, 0.99) for total potassium, and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.87, 1.09) for total calcium intake. Pooled RRs for women in the highest compared with the lowest quintiles of a combined mineral diet score were 0.72 (95% CI: 0.65, 0.81) for total stroke, 0.78 (95% CI: 0.66, 0.92) for ischemic stroke, and 0.80 (95% CI: 0.61, 1.04) for hemorrhagic stroke. In the updated meta-analyses of all prospective studies to date, the combined RR of total stroke was 0.87 (95% CI: 0.83, 0.92) for a 100-mg/d increase in magnesium intake, 0.91 (95% CI: 0.88, 0.94) for a 1000-mg/d increase in potassium intake, and 0.98 (95% CI: 0.94, 1.02) for a 300-mg/d increase in calcium intake. CONCLUSIONS: A combined mineral diet score was inversely associated with risk of stroke. High intakes of magnesium and potassium but not calcium were also significantly associated with reduced risk of stroke in women. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25948665/Association_between_intakes_of_magnesium_potassium_and_calcium_and_risk_of_stroke:_2_cohorts_of_US_women_and_updated_meta_analyses_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -