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Dietary saturated fat intake and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in elderly women: a prospective cohort study.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun; 101(6):1263-8.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The reduction of saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake has been the basis of long-standing dietary recommendations. However, recent epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting evidence in the relation between SFA consumption and risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) mortality.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the association of SFA intake with serum lipid profiles and ASVD mortality in a population-based 10-y cohort study.

DESIGN

At baseline (1998) 1469 women living in Perth, Western Australia, with a mean ± SD age of 75.2 ± 2.7 y had SFA intake measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Outcome data were serum lipids at baseline and ASVD deaths over 10 y (13,649 person-years of follow-up), retrieved from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Other risk factors for ASVD were assessed and adjusted for in multivariable analyses.

RESULTS

ASVD deaths occurred in 9.1% (134) of participants. The highest quartile of SFA intake (>31.28 g/d) had an ~16% cumulative mortality risk compared with ~5% in the lowest quartile (<17.39 g/d) (HR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.54, 6.11; P = 0.001). Baseline SFA intake was associated with baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol in multivariable-adjusted models (β: 0.199, SE: 0.056, P < 0.001 and β: 0.190, SE: 0.051, P < 0.001, respectively). However, baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol were not associated with ASVD mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

High SFA intake was associated with the risk of ASVD mortality in this population of elderly women. Although there was a strong positive association between SFA intake and LDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol was not associated with ASVD mortality in this cohort. Nevertheless, these data support dietary advice to reduce SFA intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD). lauren.blekkenhorst@research.uwa.edu.au.From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD).From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD).From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD).From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD).From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD).From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD).From the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Queen Elizabeth Medical Centre Unit, Perth, Australia (LCB, RLP, WHL, KZ, and JRL); the Departments of Endocrinology and Diabetes (RLP, KZ, and JRL), Renal Medicine (WHL), and Cardiology (PLT), Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Perth, Australia; the School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Australia (LCB and JMH); and the School of Exercise and Health Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia (AD).

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25948671

Citation

Blekkenhorst, Lauren C., et al. "Dietary Saturated Fat Intake and Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease Mortality in Elderly Women: a Prospective Cohort Study." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 101, no. 6, 2015, pp. 1263-8.
Blekkenhorst LC, Prince RL, Hodgson JM, et al. Dietary saturated fat intake and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in elderly women: a prospective cohort study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(6):1263-8.
Blekkenhorst, L. C., Prince, R. L., Hodgson, J. M., Lim, W. H., Zhu, K., Devine, A., Thompson, P. L., & Lewis, J. R. (2015). Dietary saturated fat intake and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in elderly women: a prospective cohort study. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 101(6), 1263-8. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.114.102392
Blekkenhorst LC, et al. Dietary Saturated Fat Intake and Atherosclerotic Vascular Disease Mortality in Elderly Women: a Prospective Cohort Study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;101(6):1263-8. PubMed PMID: 25948671.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary saturated fat intake and atherosclerotic vascular disease mortality in elderly women: a prospective cohort study. AU - Blekkenhorst,Lauren C, AU - Prince,Richard L, AU - Hodgson,Jonathan M, AU - Lim,Wai H, AU - Zhu,Kun, AU - Devine,Amanda, AU - Thompson,Peter L, AU - Lewis,Joshua R, Y1 - 2015/05/06/ PY - 2014/11/02/received PY - 2015/03/30/accepted PY - 2015/5/8/entrez PY - 2015/5/8/pubmed PY - 2015/8/8/medline KW - cardiovascular diseases KW - dietary fats KW - epidemiological studies KW - fatty acids KW - vascular diseases SP - 1263 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 101 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: The reduction of saturated fatty acid (SFA) intake has been the basis of long-standing dietary recommendations. However, recent epidemiologic studies have reported conflicting evidence in the relation between SFA consumption and risk of atherosclerotic vascular disease (ASVD) mortality. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association of SFA intake with serum lipid profiles and ASVD mortality in a population-based 10-y cohort study. DESIGN: At baseline (1998) 1469 women living in Perth, Western Australia, with a mean ± SD age of 75.2 ± 2.7 y had SFA intake measured by using a validated food-frequency questionnaire. Outcome data were serum lipids at baseline and ASVD deaths over 10 y (13,649 person-years of follow-up), retrieved from the Western Australian Data Linkage System. Other risk factors for ASVD were assessed and adjusted for in multivariable analyses. RESULTS: ASVD deaths occurred in 9.1% (134) of participants. The highest quartile of SFA intake (>31.28 g/d) had an ~16% cumulative mortality risk compared with ~5% in the lowest quartile (<17.39 g/d) (HR: 3.07; 95% CI: 1.54, 6.11; P = 0.001). Baseline SFA intake was associated with baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol in multivariable-adjusted models (β: 0.199, SE: 0.056, P < 0.001 and β: 0.190, SE: 0.051, P < 0.001, respectively). However, baseline serum total and LDL cholesterol were not associated with ASVD mortality. CONCLUSIONS: High SFA intake was associated with the risk of ASVD mortality in this population of elderly women. Although there was a strong positive association between SFA intake and LDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol was not associated with ASVD mortality in this cohort. Nevertheless, these data support dietary advice to reduce SFA intake. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25948671/Dietary_saturated_fat_intake_and_atherosclerotic_vascular_disease_mortality_in_elderly_women:_a_prospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.114.102392 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -