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Joint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL).
J Diabetes. 2016 May; 8(3):387-97.JD

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Inadequate sleep quantity and quality are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. This relationship is not well-examined in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos, and prior analyses may be confounded by sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study examined joint associations of sleep duration and insomnia with diabetes among diverse U.S. Hispanic/Latinos.

METHODS

Baseline data on sleep quantity and quality were obtained from 15,227 participants (mean age 41; range 18-74 years) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Complex survey multinomial logistic regression was used to examine associations between prevalent diabetes and six phenotypes defined by cross-classifying sleep duration (short ≤6 h, average >6-9 h, long >9 h) and insomnia, adjusting for sex, age, site and Hispanic/Latino background interaction, education, physical activity, diet quality, and sleep apnea.

RESULTS

In the weighted population, 14% had diabetes, 28% had insomnia, 9% were short sleepers, and 19% were long sleepers. Compared with those with average sleep and no insomnia, those with short sleep and insomnia were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02, 2.11). Average sleepers with insomnia (1.28; 95% CI 1.02, 1.61) and long sleepers without insomnia (1.33; 95% CI 1.07, 1.65) also had elevated odds of diabetes. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated associations, except with long sleep without insomnia.

CONCLUSIONS

Both decreased quantity and quality of sleep are associated with diabetes in Hispanic/Latinos, with the greatest odds among those with short sleep duration and insomnia. The association is largely explained by obesity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Department of Biostatistics, Collaborative Studies Coordinating Center, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.Department of Preventive Medicine, Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA. Institute for Minority Health Research, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, Bronx, New York, USA.Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Science, Graduate School of Public Health, San Diego State University, San Diego, California, USA.Departments of Psychology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.Department of Nutrition, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.Department of Neurology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA.Department of Psychology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida, USA.Medicine, Division of Global Public Health, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25952169

Citation

Cespedes, Elizabeth M., et al. "Joint Associations of Insomnia and Sleep Duration With Prevalent Diabetes: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL)." Journal of Diabetes, vol. 8, no. 3, 2016, pp. 387-97.
Cespedes EM, Dudley KA, Sotres-Alvarez D, et al. Joint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). J Diabetes. 2016;8(3):387-97.
Cespedes, E. M., Dudley, K. A., Sotres-Alvarez, D., Zee, P. C., Daviglus, M. L., Shah, N. A., Talavera, G. A., Gallo, L. C., Mattei, J., Qi, Q., Ramos, A. R., Schneiderman, N., Espinoza-Giacinto, R. A., & Patel, S. R. (2016). Joint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). Journal of Diabetes, 8(3), 387-97. https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-0407.12308
Cespedes EM, et al. Joint Associations of Insomnia and Sleep Duration With Prevalent Diabetes: the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). J Diabetes. 2016;8(3):387-97. PubMed PMID: 25952169.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Joint associations of insomnia and sleep duration with prevalent diabetes: The Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (HCHS/SOL). AU - Cespedes,Elizabeth M, AU - Dudley,Katherine A, AU - Sotres-Alvarez,Daniela, AU - Zee,Phyllis C, AU - Daviglus,Martha L, AU - Shah,Neomi A, AU - Talavera,Gregory A, AU - Gallo,Linda C, AU - Mattei,Josiemer, AU - Qi,Qibin, AU - Ramos,Alberto R, AU - Schneiderman,Neil, AU - Espinoza-Giacinto,Rebeca A, AU - Patel,Sanjay R, Y1 - 2015/07/21/ PY - 2014/12/22/received PY - 2015/04/08/revised PY - 2015/04/29/accepted PY - 2015/5/9/entrez PY - 2015/5/9/pubmed PY - 2017/1/10/medline KW - 2型糖尿病 KW - Hispanic Americans KW - acculturation KW - insomnia KW - sleep KW - type 2 diabetes mellitus KW - 失眠症 KW - 文化适应 KW - 睡眠 KW - 西班牙裔美国人 SP - 387 EP - 97 JF - Journal of diabetes JO - J Diabetes VL - 8 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Inadequate sleep quantity and quality are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. This relationship is not well-examined in U.S. Hispanics/Latinos, and prior analyses may be confounded by sleep apnea. This cross-sectional study examined joint associations of sleep duration and insomnia with diabetes among diverse U.S. Hispanic/Latinos. METHODS: Baseline data on sleep quantity and quality were obtained from 15,227 participants (mean age 41; range 18-74 years) from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos. Complex survey multinomial logistic regression was used to examine associations between prevalent diabetes and six phenotypes defined by cross-classifying sleep duration (short ≤6 h, average >6-9 h, long >9 h) and insomnia, adjusting for sex, age, site and Hispanic/Latino background interaction, education, physical activity, diet quality, and sleep apnea. RESULTS: In the weighted population, 14% had diabetes, 28% had insomnia, 9% were short sleepers, and 19% were long sleepers. Compared with those with average sleep and no insomnia, those with short sleep and insomnia were more likely to have diabetes (odds ratio [OR] 1.46; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.02, 2.11). Average sleepers with insomnia (1.28; 95% CI 1.02, 1.61) and long sleepers without insomnia (1.33; 95% CI 1.07, 1.65) also had elevated odds of diabetes. Further adjustment for body mass index attenuated associations, except with long sleep without insomnia. CONCLUSIONS: Both decreased quantity and quality of sleep are associated with diabetes in Hispanic/Latinos, with the greatest odds among those with short sleep duration and insomnia. The association is largely explained by obesity. SN - 1753-0407 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25952169/Joint_associations_of_insomnia_and_sleep_duration_with_prevalent_diabetes:_The_Hispanic_Community_Health_Study/Study_of_Latinos__HCHS/SOL__ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/1753-0407.12308 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -