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Carotenoid accumulation during tomato fruit ripening is modulated by the auxin-ethylene balance.
BMC Plant Biol. 2015 May 08; 15:114.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Tomato fruit ripening is controlled by ethylene and is characterized by a shift in color from green to red, a strong accumulation of lycopene, and a decrease in β-xanthophylls and chlorophylls. The role of other hormones, such as auxin, has been less studied. Auxin is retarding the fruit ripening. In tomato, there is no study of the carotenoid content and related transcript after treatment with auxin.

RESULTS

We followed the effects of application of various hormone-like substances to "Mature-Green" fruits. Application of an ethylene precursor (ACC) or of an auxin antagonist (PCIB) to tomato fruits accelerated the color shift, the accumulation of lycopene, α-, β-, and δ-carotenes and the disappearance of β-xanthophylls and chlorophyll b. By contrast, application of auxin (IAA) delayed the color shift, the lycopene accumulation and the decrease of chlorophyll a. Combined application of IAA + ACC led to an intermediate phenotype. The levels of transcripts coding for carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes, for the ripening regulator Rin, for chlorophyllase, and the levels of ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) were monitored in the treated fruits. Correlation network analyses suggest that ABA, may also be a key regulator of several responses to auxin and ethylene treatments.

CONCLUSIONS

The results suggest that IAA retards tomato ripening by affecting a set of (i) key regulators, such as Rin, ethylene and ABA, and (ii) key effectors, such as genes for lycopene and β-xanthophyll biosynthesis and for chlorophyll degradation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Université de Toulouse, INP-ENSA Toulouse, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, Avenue de l'Agrobiopole, CS 32607, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. suliyan029@126.com. Actual address: Department of Life Sciences, Xi'an University of Arts and Science, Xi'an, 710065, PR China. suliyan029@126.com.Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy, and Sustainable Development, Casaccia Research Centre, 00123, Rome, Italy. gianfranco.diretto@enea.it.Department Food and Experimental Nutrition; NAPAN/FoRC - Food Research Center, Universidade de São Paulo, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 580, Butantã, CEP 05508-000, São Paulo, SP, Brazil. epurgatt@usp.br.Université de Toulouse; UPS; UMR 5546; Laboratoire de Recherche en Sciences Végétales (LRSV), 24 Chemin de Borde Rouge, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. danoun@lrsv.ups-tlse.fr.Université de Toulouse, INP-ENSA Toulouse, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, Avenue de l'Agrobiopole, CS 32607, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. mohamed.zouine@ensat.fr. INRA, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, 24 Chemin de Borde Rouge, CS 52627, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. mohamed.zouine@ensat.fr.Genetic Engineering Research Centre, Bioengineering College, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 400044, PR China. zhengguoli@cqu.edu.cn.Université de Toulouse, INP-ENSA Toulouse, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, Avenue de l'Agrobiopole, CS 32607, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. roustan@ensat.fr. INRA, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, 24 Chemin de Borde Rouge, CS 52627, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. roustan@ensat.fr.Université de Toulouse, INP-ENSA Toulouse, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, Avenue de l'Agrobiopole, CS 32607, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. bouzayen@ensat.fr. INRA, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, 24 Chemin de Borde Rouge, CS 52627, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. bouzayen@ensat.fr.Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy, and Sustainable Development, Casaccia Research Centre, 00123, Rome, Italy. Giovanni.Giuliano@enea.it.Université de Toulouse, INP-ENSA Toulouse, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, Avenue de l'Agrobiopole, CS 32607, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. chervin@ensat.fr. INRA, UMR990 Génomique et Biotechnologie des Fruits, 24 Chemin de Borde Rouge, CS 52627, F-31326, Castanet-Tolosan, France. chervin@ensat.fr.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25953041

Citation

Su, Liyan, et al. "Carotenoid Accumulation During Tomato Fruit Ripening Is Modulated By the Auxin-ethylene Balance." BMC Plant Biology, vol. 15, 2015, p. 114.
Su L, Diretto G, Purgatto E, et al. Carotenoid accumulation during tomato fruit ripening is modulated by the auxin-ethylene balance. BMC Plant Biol. 2015;15:114.
Su, L., Diretto, G., Purgatto, E., Danoun, S., Zouine, M., Li, Z., Roustan, J. P., Bouzayen, M., Giuliano, G., & Chervin, C. (2015). Carotenoid accumulation during tomato fruit ripening is modulated by the auxin-ethylene balance. BMC Plant Biology, 15, 114. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12870-015-0495-4
Su L, et al. Carotenoid Accumulation During Tomato Fruit Ripening Is Modulated By the Auxin-ethylene Balance. BMC Plant Biol. 2015 May 8;15:114. PubMed PMID: 25953041.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Carotenoid accumulation during tomato fruit ripening is modulated by the auxin-ethylene balance. AU - Su,Liyan, AU - Diretto,Gianfranco, AU - Purgatto,Eduardo, AU - Danoun,Saïda, AU - Zouine,Mohamed, AU - Li,Zhengguo, AU - Roustan,Jean-Paul, AU - Bouzayen,Mondher, AU - Giuliano,Giovanni, AU - Chervin,Christian, Y1 - 2015/05/08/ PY - 2015/01/22/received PY - 2015/04/17/accepted PY - 2015/5/9/entrez PY - 2015/5/9/pubmed PY - 2016/1/27/medline SP - 114 EP - 114 JF - BMC plant biology JO - BMC Plant Biol VL - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Tomato fruit ripening is controlled by ethylene and is characterized by a shift in color from green to red, a strong accumulation of lycopene, and a decrease in β-xanthophylls and chlorophylls. The role of other hormones, such as auxin, has been less studied. Auxin is retarding the fruit ripening. In tomato, there is no study of the carotenoid content and related transcript after treatment with auxin. RESULTS: We followed the effects of application of various hormone-like substances to "Mature-Green" fruits. Application of an ethylene precursor (ACC) or of an auxin antagonist (PCIB) to tomato fruits accelerated the color shift, the accumulation of lycopene, α-, β-, and δ-carotenes and the disappearance of β-xanthophylls and chlorophyll b. By contrast, application of auxin (IAA) delayed the color shift, the lycopene accumulation and the decrease of chlorophyll a. Combined application of IAA + ACC led to an intermediate phenotype. The levels of transcripts coding for carotenoid biosynthesis enzymes, for the ripening regulator Rin, for chlorophyllase, and the levels of ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) were monitored in the treated fruits. Correlation network analyses suggest that ABA, may also be a key regulator of several responses to auxin and ethylene treatments. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that IAA retards tomato ripening by affecting a set of (i) key regulators, such as Rin, ethylene and ABA, and (ii) key effectors, such as genes for lycopene and β-xanthophyll biosynthesis and for chlorophyll degradation. SN - 1471-2229 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25953041/Carotenoid_accumulation_during_tomato_fruit_ripening_is_modulated_by_the_auxin_ethylene_balance_ L2 - https://bmcplantbiol.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12870-015-0495-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -