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Relationships between bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture of the distal radius and tibia with alcohol consumption.
Bone. 2015 Sep; 78:122-9.BONE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Chronic heavy alcohol consumption is associated with bone density loss and increased fracture risk, while low levels of alcohol consumption have been reported as beneficial in some studies. However, studies relating alcohol consumption to bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and bone microarchitecture, as assessed by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), are lacking.

METHODS

Here we report an analysis from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study, in which we studied associations between HR-pQCT measures at the distal radius and tibia and alcohol consumption in 376 participants (198 men and 178 women) aged 72.1-81.4 years.

RESULTS

A total of 30 (15.2%), 90 (45.5%) and 78 (39.4%) men drank minimal/none (<1 unit/week), low (≥1 unit/week and <11 units/week) and moderate/high (≥11 units/week) amounts of alcohol respectively. These figures were 74 (41.8%), 80 (45.2%) and 23 (13.0%) respectively in women for minimal/none (<1 unit/week), low (≥1 unit/week and <8 units/week) and moderate/high (≥8 units/week). At the distal radius, after adjustment for confounding factors (age, BMI, smoking status, dietary calcium intake, physical activity and socioeconomic status and years since menopause and HRT use for women), men that drank low alcohol had lower cortical thickness (p=0.038), cortical vBMD (p=0.033), and trabecular vBMD (p=0.028) and higher trabecular separation (p=0.043) than those that drank none/minimal alcohol. Similar differences were shown between minimal/none and moderate/high alcohol although these only reached statistical significance for the cortical parameters. Interestingly, after similar adjustment, women showed similar differences in the trabecular compartment between none/minimal alcohol and low alcohol at the distal tibia. However, women that drank moderate/high alcohol had significantly higher trabecular vBMD (p=0.007), trabecular thickness (p=0.026), and trabecular number (p=0.042) and higher trabecular separation (p=0.026) at the distal radius than those that drank low alcohol.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results suggest that alcohol consumption (low and moderate/high) may have a detrimental impact on bone health in men in both the cortical and trabecular compartments at the distal radius with similar results in women in the trabecular compartment between none/minimal alcohol and low alcohol at the distal tibia suggesting that avoidance of alcohol may be beneficial for bone health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; Department of Rheumatology, Lille University Hospital, Lille 2, 59037 Lille cedex, France.MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.MRC Human Nutrition Research, Elsie Widdowson Laboratory, 120 Fulbourn Road, Cambridge CB1 9NL, UK.MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand.MRC Lifecourse Epidemiology Unit University of Southampton, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK; NIHR Musculoskeletal Biomedical Research Unit, Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Science, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 5UG, UK; NIHR Nutrition Biomedical Research Centre, University of Southampton and University Hospital Southampton NHS Trust, Southampton General Hospital, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK. Electronic address: cc@mrc.soton.ac.uk.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25959415

Citation

Paccou, Julien, et al. "Relationships Between Bone Geometry, Volumetric Bone Mineral Density and Bone Microarchitecture of the Distal Radius and Tibia With Alcohol Consumption." Bone, vol. 78, 2015, pp. 122-9.
Paccou J, Edwards MH, Ward K, et al. Relationships between bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture of the distal radius and tibia with alcohol consumption. Bone. 2015;78:122-9.
Paccou, J., Edwards, M. H., Ward, K., Jameson, K., Moon, R., Dennison, E., & Cooper, C. (2015). Relationships between bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture of the distal radius and tibia with alcohol consumption. Bone, 78, 122-9. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bone.2015.05.002
Paccou J, et al. Relationships Between Bone Geometry, Volumetric Bone Mineral Density and Bone Microarchitecture of the Distal Radius and Tibia With Alcohol Consumption. Bone. 2015;78:122-9. PubMed PMID: 25959415.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relationships between bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture of the distal radius and tibia with alcohol consumption. AU - Paccou,Julien, AU - Edwards,Mark Hiley, AU - Ward,Kate, AU - Jameson,Karen, AU - Moon,Rebecca, AU - Dennison,Elaine, AU - Cooper,Cyrus, Y1 - 2015/05/08/ PY - 2014/12/02/received PY - 2015/04/29/revised PY - 2015/05/01/accepted PY - 2015/5/12/entrez PY - 2015/5/12/pubmed PY - 2016/4/9/medline KW - Alcohol consumption KW - Bone geometry KW - High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography KW - Microarchitecture KW - Volumetric bone mineral density SP - 122 EP - 9 JF - Bone JO - Bone VL - 78 N2 - PURPOSE: Chronic heavy alcohol consumption is associated with bone density loss and increased fracture risk, while low levels of alcohol consumption have been reported as beneficial in some studies. However, studies relating alcohol consumption to bone geometry, volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and bone microarchitecture, as assessed by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), are lacking. METHODS: Here we report an analysis from the Hertfordshire Cohort Study, in which we studied associations between HR-pQCT measures at the distal radius and tibia and alcohol consumption in 376 participants (198 men and 178 women) aged 72.1-81.4 years. RESULTS: A total of 30 (15.2%), 90 (45.5%) and 78 (39.4%) men drank minimal/none (<1 unit/week), low (≥1 unit/week and <11 units/week) and moderate/high (≥11 units/week) amounts of alcohol respectively. These figures were 74 (41.8%), 80 (45.2%) and 23 (13.0%) respectively in women for minimal/none (<1 unit/week), low (≥1 unit/week and <8 units/week) and moderate/high (≥8 units/week). At the distal radius, after adjustment for confounding factors (age, BMI, smoking status, dietary calcium intake, physical activity and socioeconomic status and years since menopause and HRT use for women), men that drank low alcohol had lower cortical thickness (p=0.038), cortical vBMD (p=0.033), and trabecular vBMD (p=0.028) and higher trabecular separation (p=0.043) than those that drank none/minimal alcohol. Similar differences were shown between minimal/none and moderate/high alcohol although these only reached statistical significance for the cortical parameters. Interestingly, after similar adjustment, women showed similar differences in the trabecular compartment between none/minimal alcohol and low alcohol at the distal tibia. However, women that drank moderate/high alcohol had significantly higher trabecular vBMD (p=0.007), trabecular thickness (p=0.026), and trabecular number (p=0.042) and higher trabecular separation (p=0.026) at the distal radius than those that drank low alcohol. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that alcohol consumption (low and moderate/high) may have a detrimental impact on bone health in men in both the cortical and trabecular compartments at the distal radius with similar results in women in the trabecular compartment between none/minimal alcohol and low alcohol at the distal tibia suggesting that avoidance of alcohol may be beneficial for bone health. SN - 1873-2763 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25959415/Relationships_between_bone_geometry_volumetric_bone_mineral_density_and_bone_microarchitecture_of_the_distal_radius_and_tibia_with_alcohol_consumption_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S8756-3282(15)00173-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -