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Smokers With Adequate Vitamin C Intake Show a Preferable Pulmonary Function Test.
J Am Coll Nutr 2015; 34(5):385-90JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Airflow obstruction often results from the chronic inflammation caused by cigarette smoke. It has been concluded that cigarette smoke-induced oxidative damage is prevented by ascorbic acid on a cellular level. The purpose of the current study was to explore the effect of vitamin C intake on pulmonary function in established smokers (100 or more cigarettes) and never-smokers in a Korean population.

METHODS

The 2974 enrolled men and women over the age of 40 in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV 2008 were divided into 4 groups based on smoking patterns (never-smoker vs established smoker) and vitamin C intake from dietary assessment (higher vs lower; median value: 77.18 mg/day).

RESULTS

Univariate analysis showed associations between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV/forced vital capacity (FVC) and age, gender, body mass index (BMI), pack-years, vitamin C intake, and additional micronutrient intake. On multiple logistic regression analysis, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for FEV1 < 80% predicted were 1.000 (never-smokers, higher vitamin C intake), 1.067 (0.823, 1.383; never-smokers, lower vitamin C intake), 1.224 (0.871, 1.721; established smokers, higher vitamin C intake), and 1.479 (1.057, 2.072; established smokers, lower vitamin C intake). The odds ratios for FEV1/FVC < 0.70 were 1.177 (0.821, 1.687; never-smokers, lower vitamin C intake), 1.637 (1.094, 2.445; established smokers, higher vitamin C intake), and 2.093 (1.403, 3.122; established smokers, lower vitamin C intake) after adjusting for confounding factors (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS

Korean smokers with adequate vitamin C intake showed a preferable pulmonary function test.

Authors+Show Affiliations

a Department of Family Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University of Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine , Seoul , KOREA.b Department of Family Medicine, Gangnam Severance HospitalYonsei University College of Medicine , Seoul , KOREA.c Department of Family Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine , Seoul , KOREA.b Department of Family Medicine, Gangnam Severance HospitalYonsei University College of Medicine , Seoul , KOREA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25961759

Citation

Shin, Jin Young, et al. "Smokers With Adequate Vitamin C Intake Show a Preferable Pulmonary Function Test." Journal of the American College of Nutrition, vol. 34, no. 5, 2015, pp. 385-90.
Shin JY, Shim JY, Lee DC, et al. Smokers With Adequate Vitamin C Intake Show a Preferable Pulmonary Function Test. J Am Coll Nutr. 2015;34(5):385-90.
Shin, J. Y., Shim, J. Y., Lee, D. C., & Lee, H. R. (2015). Smokers With Adequate Vitamin C Intake Show a Preferable Pulmonary Function Test. Journal of the American College of Nutrition, 34(5), pp. 385-90. doi:10.1080/07315724.2014.926152.
Shin JY, et al. Smokers With Adequate Vitamin C Intake Show a Preferable Pulmonary Function Test. J Am Coll Nutr. 2015;34(5):385-90. PubMed PMID: 25961759.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Smokers With Adequate Vitamin C Intake Show a Preferable Pulmonary Function Test. AU - Shin,Jin Young, AU - Shim,Jae Yong, AU - Lee,Duk Chul, AU - Lee,Hye Ree, Y1 - 2015/05/11/ PY - 2015/5/12/entrez PY - 2015/5/12/pubmed PY - 2016/7/1/medline KW - antioxidants KW - ascorbic acid KW - pulmonary function test KW - smoking SP - 385 EP - 90 JF - Journal of the American College of Nutrition JO - J Am Coll Nutr VL - 34 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Airflow obstruction often results from the chronic inflammation caused by cigarette smoke. It has been concluded that cigarette smoke-induced oxidative damage is prevented by ascorbic acid on a cellular level. The purpose of the current study was to explore the effect of vitamin C intake on pulmonary function in established smokers (100 or more cigarettes) and never-smokers in a Korean population. METHODS: The 2974 enrolled men and women over the age of 40 in the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey IV 2008 were divided into 4 groups based on smoking patterns (never-smoker vs established smoker) and vitamin C intake from dietary assessment (higher vs lower; median value: 77.18 mg/day). RESULTS: Univariate analysis showed associations between forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV/forced vital capacity (FVC) and age, gender, body mass index (BMI), pack-years, vitamin C intake, and additional micronutrient intake. On multiple logistic regression analysis, the odds ratios (95% confidence interval) for FEV1 < 80% predicted were 1.000 (never-smokers, higher vitamin C intake), 1.067 (0.823, 1.383; never-smokers, lower vitamin C intake), 1.224 (0.871, 1.721; established smokers, higher vitamin C intake), and 1.479 (1.057, 2.072; established smokers, lower vitamin C intake). The odds ratios for FEV1/FVC < 0.70 were 1.177 (0.821, 1.687; never-smokers, lower vitamin C intake), 1.637 (1.094, 2.445; established smokers, higher vitamin C intake), and 2.093 (1.403, 3.122; established smokers, lower vitamin C intake) after adjusting for confounding factors (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Korean smokers with adequate vitamin C intake showed a preferable pulmonary function test. SN - 1541-1087 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25961759/Smokers_With_Adequate_Vitamin_C_Intake_Show_a_Preferable_Pulmonary_Function_Test_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07315724.2014.926152 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -