Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Genotypic distribution of hepatitis C virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia.
PLoS One. 2015; 10(5):e0126764.Plos

Abstract

The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in chronic infection, which can lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Global burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated at 150 million individuals, or 3% of the world's population. The distribution of the seven major genotypes of HCV varies with geographical regions. Since Asia has a high incidence of HCV, we assessed the distribution of HCV genotypes in Thailand and Southeast Asia. From 588 HCV-positive samples obtained throughout Thailand, we characterized the HCV 5' untranslated region, Core, and NS5B regions by nested PCR. Nucleotide sequences obtained from both the Core and NS5B of these isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results were compared to the epidemiological data of HCV genotypes identified within Southeast Asian. Among the HCV subtypes characterized in the Thai samples, subtype 3a was the most predominant (36.4%), followed by 1a (19.9%), 1b (12.6%), 3b (9.7%) and 2a (0.5%). While genotype 1 was prevalent throughout Thailand (27-36%), genotype 3 was more common in the south. Genotype 6 (20.9%) constituted subtype 6f (7.8%), 6n (7.7%), 6i (3.4%), 6j and 6m (0.7% each), 6c (0.3%), 6v and 6xa (0.2% each) and its prevalence was significantly lower in southern Thailand compared to the north and northeast (p = 0.027 and p = 0.030, respectively). Within Southeast Asia, high prevalence of genotype 6 occurred in northern countries such as Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam, while genotype 3 was prevalent in Thailand and Malaysia. Island nations of Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines demonstrated prevalence of genotype 1. This study further provides regional HCV genotype information that may be useful in fostering sound public health policy and tracking future patterns of HCV spread.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.Chiangrai Prachanukroh Hospital, Chiang Rai, Thailand.Chiangrai Prachanukroh Hospital, Chiang Rai, Thailand.Udon Thani Hospital, Udon Thani, Thailand.Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand.Regional Blood Center XI Nakhorn Si Thammarat, Thai Red Cross Society, Thung Song District, Nakhon Si Thammarat, Thailand.Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.Center of Excellence in Clinical Virology, Faculty of Medicine, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25962112

Citation

Wasitthankasem, Rujipat, et al. "Genotypic Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia." PloS One, vol. 10, no. 5, 2015, pp. e0126764.
Wasitthankasem R, Vongpunsawad S, Siripon N, et al. Genotypic distribution of hepatitis C virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia. PLoS One. 2015;10(5):e0126764.
Wasitthankasem, R., Vongpunsawad, S., Siripon, N., Suya, C., Chulothok, P., Chaiear, K., Rujirojindakul, P., Kanjana, S., Theamboonlers, A., Tangkijvanich, P., & Poovorawan, Y. (2015). Genotypic distribution of hepatitis C virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia. PloS One, 10(5), e0126764. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0126764
Wasitthankasem R, et al. Genotypic Distribution of Hepatitis C Virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia. PLoS One. 2015;10(5):e0126764. PubMed PMID: 25962112.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Genotypic distribution of hepatitis C virus in Thailand and Southeast Asia. AU - Wasitthankasem,Rujipat, AU - Vongpunsawad,Sompong, AU - Siripon,Nipaporn, AU - Suya,Chutima, AU - Chulothok,Phrutsada, AU - Chaiear,Kasemporn, AU - Rujirojindakul,Pairaya, AU - Kanjana,Sawan, AU - Theamboonlers,Apiradee, AU - Tangkijvanich,Pisit, AU - Poovorawan,Yong, Y1 - 2015/05/11/ PY - 2015/01/14/received PY - 2015/04/07/accepted PY - 2015/5/12/entrez PY - 2015/5/12/pubmed PY - 2016/2/3/medline SP - e0126764 EP - e0126764 JF - PloS one JO - PLoS One VL - 10 IS - 5 N2 - The majority of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in chronic infection, which can lead to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Global burden of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is estimated at 150 million individuals, or 3% of the world's population. The distribution of the seven major genotypes of HCV varies with geographical regions. Since Asia has a high incidence of HCV, we assessed the distribution of HCV genotypes in Thailand and Southeast Asia. From 588 HCV-positive samples obtained throughout Thailand, we characterized the HCV 5' untranslated region, Core, and NS5B regions by nested PCR. Nucleotide sequences obtained from both the Core and NS5B of these isolates were subjected to phylogenetic analysis, and genotypes were assigned using published reference genotypes. Results were compared to the epidemiological data of HCV genotypes identified within Southeast Asian. Among the HCV subtypes characterized in the Thai samples, subtype 3a was the most predominant (36.4%), followed by 1a (19.9%), 1b (12.6%), 3b (9.7%) and 2a (0.5%). While genotype 1 was prevalent throughout Thailand (27-36%), genotype 3 was more common in the south. Genotype 6 (20.9%) constituted subtype 6f (7.8%), 6n (7.7%), 6i (3.4%), 6j and 6m (0.7% each), 6c (0.3%), 6v and 6xa (0.2% each) and its prevalence was significantly lower in southern Thailand compared to the north and northeast (p = 0.027 and p = 0.030, respectively). Within Southeast Asia, high prevalence of genotype 6 occurred in northern countries such as Myanmar, Laos, and Vietnam, while genotype 3 was prevalent in Thailand and Malaysia. Island nations of Singapore, Indonesia and Philippines demonstrated prevalence of genotype 1. This study further provides regional HCV genotype information that may be useful in fostering sound public health policy and tracking future patterns of HCV spread. SN - 1932-6203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25962112/Genotypic_distribution_of_hepatitis_C_virus_in_Thailand_and_Southeast_Asia_ L2 - https://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0126764 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -