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Longitudinal symptom course in adults with recurrent depression: Impact on impairment and risk of psychopathology in offspring.
J Affect Disord. 2015 Aug 15; 182:32-8.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is common and is associated with an increased risk of psychopathology in offspring. However, depression shows considerable heterogeneity in its course over time. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between parent depression symptom trajectories and (i) quality of life and social impairment and (ii) psychiatric disorder and depression symptoms in their offspring.

METHOD

Participants were from a longitudinal study of 337 parents with recurrent MDD and their adolescent offspring. Families were assessed on three occasions over four years. Parent depressive symptoms and current MDD diagnosis were assessed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry. Adult quality of life and social impairment were derived from the EuroQol and current employment status. Psychiatric outcomes in offspring were assessed using the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment.

RESULTS

Using latent class growth analysis, three distinct classes of parental depression symptoms were identified (asymptomatic, mild, and chronic high). Parent depression classes were associated with their own quality of life and social impairment, and with psychiatric disorder and depression symptoms in their offspring.

LIMITATIONS

(i) We were unable to test associations with specific offspring disorders, (ii) we did not address the direction of effects underlying associations, and (iii) the sample consisted primarily of mothers and findings may not generalise to depressed fathers.

CONCLUSION

Longitudinal assessments of depressive symptoms in parents could help to identify families who are most in need of early intervention.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK. Electronic address: becky.mars@bristol.ac.uk.Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, UK.Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, UK.Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, UK.Rudd Centre for Adoption Research and Practice, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, UK; Institute of Genetic, Neurobiological and Social Foundations of Child Development, Tomsk State University, Russia.Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, UK.Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, UK.Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, UK; Rudd Centre for Adoption Research and Practice, School of Psychology, University of Sussex, UK.Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, UK.Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, UK.Institute of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, MRC Centre for Neuropsychiatric Genetics and Genomics, Cardiff University, UK.School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol, UK.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25965693

Citation

Mars, Becky, et al. "Longitudinal Symptom Course in Adults With Recurrent Depression: Impact On Impairment and Risk of Psychopathology in Offspring." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 182, 2015, pp. 32-8.
Mars B, Collishaw S, Hammerton G, et al. Longitudinal symptom course in adults with recurrent depression: Impact on impairment and risk of psychopathology in offspring. J Affect Disord. 2015;182:32-8.
Mars, B., Collishaw, S., Hammerton, G., Rice, F., Harold, G. T., Smith, D., Bevan Jones, R., Sellers, R., Potter, R., Craddock, N., Thapar, A. K., Heron, J., & Thapar, A. (2015). Longitudinal symptom course in adults with recurrent depression: Impact on impairment and risk of psychopathology in offspring. Journal of Affective Disorders, 182, 32-8. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2015.04.018
Mars B, et al. Longitudinal Symptom Course in Adults With Recurrent Depression: Impact On Impairment and Risk of Psychopathology in Offspring. J Affect Disord. 2015 Aug 15;182:32-8. PubMed PMID: 25965693.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal symptom course in adults with recurrent depression: Impact on impairment and risk of psychopathology in offspring. AU - Mars,Becky, AU - Collishaw,Stephan, AU - Hammerton,Gemma, AU - Rice,Frances, AU - Harold,Gordon T, AU - Smith,Daniel, AU - Bevan Jones,Rhys, AU - Sellers,Ruth, AU - Potter,Robert, AU - Craddock,Nicolas, AU - Thapar,Ajay K, AU - Heron,Jon, AU - Thapar,Anita, Y1 - 2015/04/17/ PY - 2014/07/31/received PY - 2015/04/08/revised PY - 2015/04/08/accepted PY - 2015/5/13/entrez PY - 2015/5/13/pubmed PY - 2015/12/29/medline KW - Adolescent KW - Depression: parent KW - Longitudinal KW - Symptom course SP - 32 EP - 8 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 182 N2 - BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is common and is associated with an increased risk of psychopathology in offspring. However, depression shows considerable heterogeneity in its course over time. The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between parent depression symptom trajectories and (i) quality of life and social impairment and (ii) psychiatric disorder and depression symptoms in their offspring. METHOD: Participants were from a longitudinal study of 337 parents with recurrent MDD and their adolescent offspring. Families were assessed on three occasions over four years. Parent depressive symptoms and current MDD diagnosis were assessed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry. Adult quality of life and social impairment were derived from the EuroQol and current employment status. Psychiatric outcomes in offspring were assessed using the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Assessment. RESULTS: Using latent class growth analysis, three distinct classes of parental depression symptoms were identified (asymptomatic, mild, and chronic high). Parent depression classes were associated with their own quality of life and social impairment, and with psychiatric disorder and depression symptoms in their offspring. LIMITATIONS: (i) We were unable to test associations with specific offspring disorders, (ii) we did not address the direction of effects underlying associations, and (iii) the sample consisted primarily of mothers and findings may not generalise to depressed fathers. CONCLUSION: Longitudinal assessments of depressive symptoms in parents could help to identify families who are most in need of early intervention. SN - 1573-2517 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25965693/Longitudinal_symptom_course_in_adults_with_recurrent_depression:_Impact_on_impairment_and_risk_of_psychopathology_in_offspring_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(15)00233-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -