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One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients.
Nutrients. 2015 May 11; 7(5):3449-63.N

Abstract

There is concern that egg intake may increase blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we have previously shown that eggs reduce inflammation in patients at risk for T2DM, including obese subjects and those with metabolic syndrome. Thus, we hypothesized that egg intake would not alter plasma glucose in T2DM patients when compared to oatmeal intake. Our primary endpoints for this clinical intervention were plasma glucose and the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6). As secondary endpoints, we evaluated additional parameters of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, oxidative stress and inflammation. Twenty-nine subjects, 35-65 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values <9% were recruited and randomly allocated to consume isocaloric breakfasts containing either one egg/day or 40 g of oatmeal with 472 mL of lactose-free milk/day for five weeks. Following a three-week washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate breakfast. At the end of each period, we measured all primary and secondary endpoints. Subjects completed four-day dietary recalls and one exercise questionnaire for each breakfast period. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose, our primary endpoint, plasma lipids, lipoprotein size or subfraction concentrations, insulin, HbA1c, apolipoprotein B, oxidized LDL or C-reactive protein. However, after adjusting for gender, age and body mass index, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) (p < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.01), one of our primary endpoints were significantly reduced during the egg period. These results suggest that compared to an oatmeal-based breakfast, eggs do not have any detrimental effects on lipoprotein or glucose metabolism in T2DM. In contrast, eggs reduce AST and TNF-α in this population characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo (CIAD), Hermosillo, Sonora, 83304, Mexico. nydia@ciad.mx.Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo (CIAD), Hermosillo, Sonora, 83304, Mexico. fabe_vi@hotmail.com.Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo (CIAD), Hermosillo, Sonora, 83304, Mexico. melina@ciad.mx.Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo (CIAD), Hermosillo, Sonora, 83304, Mexico. eartalejo@ciad.mx.Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. david_178@hotmail.com.Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. candersen@fairfield.edu.Hospital Ignacio Chavez, Hermosillo, Sonora, 83190, Mexico. herlindov@yahoo.com.mx.Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269, USA. maria-luz.fernandez@uconn.edu.

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

25970149

Citation

Ballesteros, Martha Nydia, et al. "One Egg Per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast Without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients." Nutrients, vol. 7, no. 5, 2015, pp. 3449-63.
Ballesteros MN, Valenzuela F, Robles AE, et al. One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients. Nutrients. 2015;7(5):3449-63.
Ballesteros, M. N., Valenzuela, F., Robles, A. E., Artalejo, E., Aguilar, D., Andersen, C. J., Valdez, H., & Fernandez, M. L. (2015). One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients. Nutrients, 7(5), 3449-63. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu7053449
Ballesteros MN, et al. One Egg Per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast Without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients. Nutrients. 2015 May 11;7(5):3449-63. PubMed PMID: 25970149.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - One Egg per Day Improves Inflammation when Compared to an Oatmeal-Based Breakfast without Increasing Other Cardiometabolic Risk Factors in Diabetic Patients. AU - Ballesteros,Martha Nydia, AU - Valenzuela,Fabrizio, AU - Robles,Alma E, AU - Artalejo,Elizabeth, AU - Aguilar,David, AU - Andersen,Catherine J, AU - Valdez,Herlindo, AU - Fernandez,Maria Luz, Y1 - 2015/05/11/ PY - 2015/04/03/received PY - 2015/04/26/revised PY - 2015/05/05/accepted PY - 2015/5/14/entrez PY - 2015/5/15/pubmed PY - 2016/1/21/medline KW - IL-6 KW - TNF-α KW - diabetes KW - eggs KW - glucose KW - inflammation KW - lipoproteins SP - 3449 EP - 63 JF - Nutrients JO - Nutrients VL - 7 IS - 5 N2 - There is concern that egg intake may increase blood glucose in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, we have previously shown that eggs reduce inflammation in patients at risk for T2DM, including obese subjects and those with metabolic syndrome. Thus, we hypothesized that egg intake would not alter plasma glucose in T2DM patients when compared to oatmeal intake. Our primary endpoints for this clinical intervention were plasma glucose and the inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin 6 (IL-6). As secondary endpoints, we evaluated additional parameters of glucose metabolism, dyslipidemias, oxidative stress and inflammation. Twenty-nine subjects, 35-65 years with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values <9% were recruited and randomly allocated to consume isocaloric breakfasts containing either one egg/day or 40 g of oatmeal with 472 mL of lactose-free milk/day for five weeks. Following a three-week washout period, subjects were assigned to the alternate breakfast. At the end of each period, we measured all primary and secondary endpoints. Subjects completed four-day dietary recalls and one exercise questionnaire for each breakfast period. There were no significant differences in plasma glucose, our primary endpoint, plasma lipids, lipoprotein size or subfraction concentrations, insulin, HbA1c, apolipoprotein B, oxidized LDL or C-reactive protein. However, after adjusting for gender, age and body mass index, aspartate amino-transferase (AST) (p < 0.05) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (p < 0.01), one of our primary endpoints were significantly reduced during the egg period. These results suggest that compared to an oatmeal-based breakfast, eggs do not have any detrimental effects on lipoprotein or glucose metabolism in T2DM. In contrast, eggs reduce AST and TNF-α in this population characterized by chronic low-grade inflammation. SN - 2072-6643 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/25970149/One_Egg_per_Day_Improves_Inflammation_when_Compared_to_an_Oatmeal_Based_Breakfast_without_Increasing_Other_Cardiometabolic_Risk_Factors_in_Diabetic_Patients_ L2 - https://www.mdpi.com/resolver?pii=nu7053449 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -